The weather service said there is a threat of tsunami waves reaching 0.3 to 1 meter (about 1 to 3 feet) above tide level for the coasts of Jamaica, Belize, Cuba, Honduras, Mexico and the Cayman Islands.
The United States Geological Survey said the earthquake had a preliminary depth of 10 kilometers (6 miles).
The quake hit 125 kilometers (77.6 miles) north-northwest of Lucea in Jamaica.
There are no initial reports of damage or casualties.

 

 Sen. Mike Braun speaks to the press as he walks to the Senate chamber following a break in the Senate impeachment trial on January 27. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Mike Braun, an Indiana Republican, said he thought Trump defense attorney Alan Dershowitz’s presentation yesterday helped senators concerned about the allegations in former national defense secretary John Bolton’s draft book manuscript come to a conclusion that it was not impeachable conduct.

“I think he probably gave a lot more peace of mind to people that were wanting to see how to sort through it, when he made a strong case that each article was ill-founded,” Braun said. “And the key thing, and I asked him about it after he said it, was even a Bolton’s revelation in its full form was true, is that impeachable in your opinion? He said no because it imputes motives.”

About Dershowitz’s comments: At the end of a long day of trial arguments on Monday that largely ignored the new Bolton drama, Dershowitz argued that even if Bolton’s reported claim was true, it would not amount to an impeachable offense. He made a case for expansive presidential power, saying that a quid pro quo alone does not amount to an abuse of power — the basis of the first article of impeachment — which he said was not sufficient in itself to justify ending a presidency.

Braun said that while he doesn’t see a need for Bolton’s testimony, if the Senate does call witnesses he says it has to be reciprocal.

“If you cross that threshold it has to be reciprocal, and I’m guessing Joe Biden would be the one individual you’d want to talk to,” Bruan said.

Asked to clarify if he wanted Joe or Hunter Biden, Bruan said: “Either one — or the whistleblower.”

“Reciprocity, is I think something, if that’s not there, there will be no interest from most of us in the Republican side,” he added.

The airline said in a statement that “significant decline in demand” has forced it to suspend flights from February 1 though February 8 between its US hubs and Beijing, Hong Kong and Shanghai.
In total, 24 round trips are affected. They are between Hong Kong to San Francisco and Newark; Beijing (PEK) to Washington Dulles, Chicago O’Hare and Newark; and Shanghai (PVG) to San Francisco, Newark and Chicago O’Hare.
“We will continue to monitor the situation as it develops and will adjust our schedule as needed,” the airline said.
It’s the most drastic action yet by a US airline as the deadly coronavirus continues to spread. American Airlines (AAL), Delta Air Lines (DAL) and United (UAL) all extended change fee waivers through the end of February.
In a statement, American said “we have not adjusted our flight schedule at this time. We are continuing to closely monitor the situation.”
Delta did not immediately respond to CNN Business’ request for comment.
The coronavirus continues to spread. More than 100 people have died and more than 4,500 cases have been confirmed in mainland China, according to health officials in the country. Dozens of others have been infected worldwide, including at least five cases in the United States.
The Centers for Disease Control has said it is now monitoring for symptoms of the virus among passengers arriving at 20 US airports.

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“We have to resolve in a couple of days if we need witnesses or not — this is an issue that’s outstanding that we don’t have a good way to be able to answer,” Lankford told CNN’s Dana Bash. “We can’t say six weeks from now we’ll be able to see it. We’ve got to be able to see it in advance to be able to make that decision on witnesses in a couple days.”
Asked if seeing the manuscript would “be in lieu” of having Bolton testify in the trial, Lankford said that was not what he was suggesting.
“No, this is read the manuscript to be able to see if we need to call John Bolton, so that question’s unanswered,” he said. “We won’t know how to answer that question until we get through today’s testimony, a couple of days still of questions. I’m just saying this needs to be a part of our information so we can make that decision about witnesses.”
On Sunday, The New York Times, citing multiple people’s descriptions of an unpublished draft manuscript by Bolton, reported Trump in August told his then-national security adviser that he wanted to continue holding military aid to Ukraine until the country helped with investigations into Democrats, including former Vice President Joe Biden. Trump’s purported statement, as described by Bolton, would directly tie the US military aid freeze with the President’s requests that Ukraine announce investigations into his political rivals — undermining a key pillar of the President’s impeachment defense that the two circumstances are unrelated.
Trump’s attempts to pressure Ukraine to investigate Hunter Biden and Joe Biden, his potential 2020 rival, are at the center of the President’s impeachment trial. Trump has repeatedly made unfounded and false claims to allege that the Bidens acted improperly in Ukraine. There is no evidence of wrongdoing by either Biden.
The news has placed new pressure on Senate Republicans to allow witnesses, including Bolton, to testify in the trial. Democrats have been trying to peel off four GOP senators in order to subpoena witnesses, including Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee.
Impeachment witness debate in limbo as Senate prepares for next phase of trial

When asked by CNN on Tuesday if she’d like to read his manuscript, Murkowski replied, “I think that Bolton probably has something to offer us. So we’ll figure out how we’re going to learn more.”
Pressed on whether she’d actually vote to subpoena Bolton’s testimony, she said: “We’re going to have an opportunity for that on probably Friday.”
The Republican-controlled Senate approved last week rules for the trial that delays the question of whether the Senate should subpoena witnesses and documents until after the Democratic House impeachment managers and the President’s defense team concluded their opening arguments. Trump’s team is expected to wrap up on Tuesday, and the Democrats finished presenting their case late last week.
Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, offered his support of Lankford’s idea on Tuesday, writing in a tweet that the manuscript should be available “in a classified setting where each Senator has the opportunity to review the manuscript and make their own determination.”
Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, another potential swing vote in the trial, told reporters on Tuesday that he hasn’t made up his mind about whether he wants to see the Bolton manuscript.
“I haven’t decided on that to be honest with you,” Scott said. “Folks have talked about using the manuscript as a way of getting the testimony … I haven’t considered if I’d find that acceptable or not.”
The comments from Lankford received some pushback, including from Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, who called it a “laugh out loud” proposal.
“They spent days criticizing us going into a secret bunker, and now they want to take a public document and put it in a secret bunker?” he said on Tuesday. “Whiff of desperation is what I’ll call it.”
Senate TV

President Trump’s attorneys have been calling the Senate “a court” and “tribunal” during proceedings this week — but when they’re in federal court, the administration has tried to keep the House from getting potential evidence against the President by arguing the opposite.

The House general counsel highlighted this doublespeak to federal appellate judges today, in the latest filing in a closely watched and still undecided court case.

“During the Senate impeachment trial, one of President Trump’s attorneys opened his remarks by informing the Senators that they do not sit as jurors,” House counsel Doug Letter wrote to the DC Circuit Court of Appeals today, quoting Ken Starr on Monday saying “We are in court.” 

But in the case before the appellate court — where the Justice Department has attempted to keep secret grand jury material collected by special counsel Robert Mueller and sought by the House Judiciary Committee as it investigates Trump — “DOJ’s principal argument in this case is that a Senate impeachment trial is not a ‘judicial proceeding,’” Letter wrote. The House has argued that it should be able to see the typically confidential grand jury information, because it needs to determine whether Trump obstructed Mueller and should be impeached on additional counts. 

How we got here: The House won access to the Mueller grand jury material at the trial-court level. The Trump administration appealed the decision — stopping the material from going to the House. The appeals court’s ruling could come any day.

“Because DOJ’s position in this case cannot be reconciled with President’s position in the impeachment, DOJ may wish to withdraw its argument that a Senate impeachment trial does not qualify as a judicial proceeding,” Letter wrote to the appeals court on Tuesday.

The Senate proceedings over the past week have prompted attorneys for the House to grasp onto several contradictions between Trump’s impeachment arguments and the Justice Department’s arguments in court. 

Previously, the House notified the appeals court how the Justice Department doesn’t want the judiciary to decide its disputes with Congress, yet Trump’s attorneys told the Senate that the House impeachment votes should have waited for court decisions. 

Separately from the court cases, the Trump administration has refused to turn over documents the House requested for its impeachment investigation and several top administration officials did not show up to testify, even when subpoenaed. The House largely chose not to sue over their thwarted subpoenas. 

The two ongoing court cases — which began prior to the Ukraine impeachment inquiry, shortly after the Mueller investigation ended — could affect the impeachment proceedings.

  1. One is the grand jury records case, where the House seeks redacted sections of the Mueller report that are secret under grand jury rules and the evidence related to those sections. This material is important, the House says, because it highlights what witnesses may have told the grand jury about Trump, and could help them determine whether he lied in his written answers to Mueller—potentially another impeachable offense.
  2. The other major ongoing case seeks to enforce the House’s subpoena former White House counsel Don McGahn, who witnesses many of Trump’s attempts to obstruct the Mueller investigation. (A trial-level judge ruled that the White House can’t stop its former officials like McGahn from testifying by claiming absolute immunity. A similar ruling from an appeals court and the Supreme Court could throw the standoff over witnesses during the Senate trial into disarray.)
“We have to resolve in a couple of days if we need witnesses or not — this is an issue that’s outstanding that we don’t have a good way to be able to answer,” Lankford told CNN’s Dana Bash. “We can’t say six weeks from now we’ll be able to see it. We’ve got to be able to see it in advance to be able to make that decision on witnesses in a couple days.”
Asked if seeing the manuscript would “be in lieu” of having Bolton testify in the trial, Lankford said that was not what he was suggesting.
“No, this is read the manuscript to be able to see if we need to call John Bolton, so that question’s unanswered,” he said. “We won’t know how to answer that question until we get through today’s testimony, a couple of days still of questions. I’m just saying this needs to be a part of our information so we can make that decision about witnesses.”
On Sunday, The New York Times, citing multiple people’s descriptions of an unpublished draft manuscript by Bolton, reported Trump in August told his then-national security adviser that he wanted to continue holding military aid to Ukraine until the country helped with investigations into Democrats, including former Vice President Joe Biden. Trump’s purported statement, as described by Bolton, would directly tie the US military aid freeze with the President’s requests that Ukraine announce investigations into his political rivals — undermining a key pillar of the President’s impeachment defense that the two circumstances are unrelated.
Trump’s attempts to pressure Ukraine to investigate Hunter Biden and Joe Biden, his potential 2020 rival, are at the center of the President’s impeachment trial. Trump has repeatedly made unfounded and false claims to allege that the Bidens acted improperly in Ukraine. There is no evidence of wrongdoing by either Biden.
The news has placed new pressure on Senate Republicans to allow witnesses, including Bolton, to testify in the trial. Democrats have been trying to peel off four GOP senators in order to subpoena witnesses, including Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee.
Impeachment witness debate in limbo as Senate prepares for next phase of trial

When asked by CNN on Tuesday if she’d like to read his manuscript, Murkowski replied, “I think that Bolton probably has something to offer us. So we’ll figure out how we’re going to learn more.”
Pressed on whether she’d actually vote to subpoena Bolton’s testimony, she said: “We’re going to have an opportunity for that on probably Friday.”
The Republican-controlled Senate approved last week rules for the trial that delays the question of whether the Senate should subpoena witnesses and documents until after the Democratic House impeachment managers and the President’s defense team concluded their opening arguments. Trump’s team is expected to wrap up on Tuesday, and the Democrats finished presenting their case late last week.
Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, offered his support of Lankford’s idea on Tuesday, writing in a tweet that the manuscript should be available “in a classified setting where each Senator has the opportunity to review the manuscript and make their own determination.”
Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, another potential swing vote in the trial, told reporters on Tuesday that he hasn’t made up his mind about whether he wants to see the Bolton manuscript.
“I haven’t decided on that to be honest with you,” Scott said. “Folks have talked about using the manuscript as a way of getting the testimony … I haven’t considered if I’d find that acceptable or not.”
The comments from Lankford received some pushback, including from Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, who called it a “laugh out loud” proposal.
“They spent days criticizing us going into a secret bunker, and now they want to take a public document and put it in a secret bunker?” he said on Tuesday. “Whiff of desperation is what I’ll call it.”
Coach John Altobelli, his wife Keri and his youngest daughter Alyssa were among the nine people killed — along with NBA legend Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna — Sunday afternoon when the helicopter they were in crashed into a hillside in Calabasas, California.
College baseball coach John Altobelli among the victims of helicopter crash that killed Kobe Bryant

Altobelli’s players at the Southern California community college voted Monday to keep their season opener against Southwestern Community College, to be played at home at 2 p.m. PT Tuesday, the Orange County Register reported.
Altobelli, who was about to start his 28th season at OCC, will be honored in a ceremony 15 minutes before Tuesday’s first pitch.
“Please spread the word and let’s get as much love and support into Wendell Pickens Field as (we) can. We all sure could use it,” the school in Costa Mesa wrote in a post on Facebook.
Altobelli compiled a 705-478-4 record at OCC and was named national coach of the year in 2019 by the American Baseball Coaches Association. He coached OCC teams to four state championships, eight trips to the state semifinals and seven conference championships.

He was ‘always excited to ride with Kobe’

Alyssa and Gianna, both 13, were basketball teammates at Bryant’s Mamba Academy. They were flying to their basketball game in Thousand Oaks, and Bryant was expected to coach.
The Altobellis had flown with the Bryants to games before.
“He was always excited to ride with Kobe on the helicopter,” Nate Johnson, Altobelli’s assistant coach at OCC, told CNN’s “New Day” on Tuesday.
“This wasn’t the first time that he or Alyssa or Keri went on this flight,” Johnson said. “So, he was telling us on Saturday that he was going up to Thousand Oaks and get to ride the helicopter with Kobe.
“And Sunday morning I was just kind of sitting around in my apartment with my wife, and one of my friends texted me and said, ‘Hey, did you hear about Kobe?’ I was like, ‘No, what?’ He goes, ‘Well, his helicopter went down.’
“And my heart sank because I knew Alto was on that.”
This is an image shared by the Altobelli family of (from left to right): Keri Altobelli, John Altobelli, Lexi Altobelli, J.J. Altobelli and Alyssa Altobelli.

This is an image shared by the Altobelli family of (from left to right): Keri Altobelli, John Altobelli, Lexi Altobelli, J.J. Altobelli and Alyssa Altobelli.

Kobe Bryant brought out Alyssa’s love of basketball

Altobelli was very proud of Alyssa’s basketball exploits, Johnson said.
“He shared everything. I knew every game, I knew every practice that Alyssa was a part of, and he was so proud of Alyssa and so proud of what she was doing,” Johnson, now OCC’s acting head coach, said.
“She found a love for basketball, and Kobe brought that love out for her, just like he did for a lot of people. And Alto was — he was so happy that she was able to get coached by someone that was elite.
“Alto is an elite person as well. And I think that’s why Kobe latched onto the Altobelli family. They were elite. And Kobe, obviously, being elite, he found that family to be someone that he could invite into their inner circle and Alto and Keri and Alyssa, those three, they were special.”

Altobelli leaves behind a daughter and a son

Altobelli was a “giant on campus,” OCC President Angelica Suarez said Tuesday.
“He loved his students, his colleagues and he loved this college, and this loss has broken our hearts,” Suarez said. “It is a tremendous loss, one that will be felt for years to come.”
Altobelli is survived by his daughter Lexi, 16, and his son J.J., a 29-year-old scout with the Boston Red Sox.
Orange Coast College has established a memorial fund to help the family.
The pledge — launched by Protect our Defenders, an organization devoted to ending rape and sexual assault in the military — would strip the power to investigate sexual assault from senior officers and allow soldiers to report such crimes to a trained, independent military prosecutor. The language is based on legislation proposed by Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Democratic Rep. Jackie Speier of California.
Ten of the 12 Democratic candidates running for president have signed on.
But it’s not as simple as signing a pledge.
The military keeps all discipline issues in the chain of command as it’s seen as the backbone of how the military functions. Sexual assault is not an exception. Service members report alleged assaults to their commander. That superior then has the authority to determine how the cases are handled and whether they ultimately move forward. The Pentagon has pushed back on taking sexual assault out of the chain of command for years.
The only two veterans in the race — former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard — signed on.
Pete Buttigieg, who served in the US Navy Reserves and completed one tour in Afghanistan in 2014, has touted his service on the campaign trail.
“Pete believes that if our service members can sum up the courage to put their lives on the line to defend our country, our elected officials should have the courage to break from the past to ensure safe and healthy environments for our men and women in uniform,” said Rachel Thomas, Buttigieg deputy communications director, in an email.
Exclusive: Evelyn Yang reveals she was sexually assaulted by her OB-GYN while pregnant

Businessman Andrew Yang, whose wife revealed earlier this month that she was sexually assaulted while pregnant, sharing her story in an exclusive interview with CNN’s Dana Bash, endorsed the plan.
“Sexual assault in the military is absolutely abhorrent and we owe all of our service members the protections and accountability they deserve,” Yang’s national press secretary SY Lee told CNN in an email.
Only former Vice President Joe Biden and former New York Mayor Mike Boomberg have not signed the pledge, but say they would address the issue.
The Biden campaign said in a statement to CNN that he is committed to changing “the culture of abuse” within the Armed Forces.
“He will immediately appoint a commission comprised of current and former military leaders, military sexual assault survivors and their advocates, and prominent sexual assault experts, to make concrete recommendations to him within 90 days,” the statement said. “All options should be considered to end this scourge.”
Bloomberg’s campaign said it is considering the issue.
“We’re considering this pledge as we continue to release our policy proposals, including plans around the military and the best ways to prevent sexual assault,” a spokesperson for the Bloomberg campaign wrote in an email.
Retired Col. Don Christensen was the chief prosecutor for the Air Force between 2010 and 2014. He also served as trial counsel, defense counsel or military judge for 23 years. He is now the president of Protect our Defenders.
“In the military justice system, the commander always knows the suspect. And if they have a favorable opinion — which they normally are going to have of the suspect — it’s going to color the way they handle the case,” Christensen said. “A lot of times both the victim and the accused work for the commander. They have to make a decision supporting one or the other which is a conflict within that unit.”
CNN reached out to the Pentagon, the White House and the Trump campaign for comment on the military sexual assault pledge but did not receive responses.
The Pentagon has not been on board with the proposal.
As recently as last year, the secretaries of each service branch voiced opposition to taking military sexual assault cases out of the chain of command.
Responding to questions at the first national summit on military sexual assault last year, hosted at the Naval Academy in Annapolis Maryland, the secretaries of the Army, Navy and Air Force were unanimous on that point.
And Arizona Republican Sen. Martha McSally, who revealed last year that she was raped while serving in the US Air Force, advocated to keep sexual assault within the chain of command in a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing in March.
“I do not take this position lightly,” McSally said. “It has been framed often that some people are advocating for the victims while others are advocating for the command chain or the military establishment. This is clearly a false choice… We cannot command change from the outside alone. It must be deployed from within. It must be built and constantly maintained and expertly managed by commanders who are themselves educated, conditioned, and given the tools to ensure what you survived and what I survived happens to no warrior under their command.”
She added: “To that end, I very strongly believe that the commander must not be removed from the decision-making responsibility of preventing, detecting, and prosecuting military sexual assault.”
Other military sexual assault survivors like former Air Force SSgt. Harmony Allen and former Navy helicopter pilot Lt. Paula Coughlin — the faces of the Protect our Defenders campaign — disagree. They told CNN that more soldiers would report if given the protection of an outside prosecutor because of circumstances unique to the military: like being stationed with the accused and even sharing a commander.
“Things get pushed under the rug,” Allen said, of the current system.
“I just tell anybody who asks me in any work environment, ‘What should I do if I’m harassed or assaulted at work?’ I tell them, ‘Call the police. Call 9-1-1.’ Why would you think some guy in HR is going to protect and initiate the proper investigation? Why would you think a helicopter pilot in your command is going to protect you and initiate an investigation? They’re not trained. You call law enforcement,” Coughlin said.
“It’s just so simple, and it’s taken so many years to make the message that clear.”
Told a watch like his is now worth $400,000 at auction between, the man toppled to the ground.
But the appraiser wasn’t finished. Because of the watch’s pristine condition, the watch was valued at between $500,000 and $700,000.
The man appeared on the PBS series “Antiques Roadshow” with his unworn Rolex Oyster Cosmograph Reference No. 6263 in hopes of learning its value.
The show travels across the country “in search of America’s hidden treasures.” During Monday night’s episode, which featured the man and his Rolex, the show was at Bonanzaville in Fargo, North Dakota.
The man, a US Air Force veteran, said he purchased the Rolex because he heard it was a good brand for scuba diving. He said he ordered it through the Air Force base exchange in November 1974 and said it arrived in April 1975.
But after he received the watch, which cost nearly a month’s salary at the time even with a 10% discount, he decided it was “too nice” to take into saltwater.
The Rolex Oyster Cosmograph was made in 1971.

Instead, he kept the watch in a safety deposit box for nearly 40 years, only taking it out a few times to check on it.
Not only was the watch in perfect condition, but the veteran had saved the warranty papers, original Rolex brochure for the Cosmograph, two receipts, and the two original boxes the Rolex came in.
Collectors love the watch because Paul Newman wore a similar model in the 1969 film, “Winning,” said appraiser Peter Planes.
“It’s an absolute fabulous find. It’s one of the rarest Paul Newman models, and in this condition, I don’t think there’s a better one in the world,” Planes said.
The watch is extremely, extremely rare, according to Planes, who valued the Rolex at a price between $500,000 to $700,000 since it was unworn and included all its documentation.
“This appraisal hits the Roadshow trifecta: an extremely rare item, a personal backstory that shines a light on our country’s history, and a fantastic guest reaction,” Marsha Bemko, the show’s executive producer, said in a statement.
“For the first time ever, we had a guest so overcome by the valuation of his treasure that he falls to the ground in surprise. But don’t worry, he gets back up to finish the appraisal!”