According to the US Golf Association, Trump shot a 68 in April 2019. That’s a remarkable score for anyone who isn’t a professional golfer but a truly outstanding achievement for a 72-year-old man who also happens to be the President of the United States.
(Sidebar: It’s hard to pinpoint what exact date Trump shot the 68; he played twice at his club in West Palm Beach over Easter weekend — including a round with conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh and LPGA star Lexi Thompson — and four times at his club in Sterling, Virginia, according to CNN’s Betsy Klein.)

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That 68 appears to be Trump’s best round ever — or certainly within the last eight years. (Golf.com says Trump has never reported a score in the 60s before.) Trump, like most golfers, reports a chunk of his scores to the US Golf Association to maintain an official handicap (how many shots you, typically, shoot over par on a golf course.) The most recent score he reported before the April round of his life was in October 2018 when he shot a 96, which is, uh, less good.
In fact, of the last 20 rounds — dating back to 2011 — Trump has recorded with the USGA, his last two are the lowest and highest he has shot. Other than the 68 and the 96, Trump had 11 rounds in the 70s and 7 rounds in the 80s. His current handicap is 1.8, which is very, very good. Trump’s 1.8 handicap put him in the top 4% of all golfers who report handicap information, according, again, to the USGA.
The question everyone will ask — did Trump really shoot a 68 at age 72???? — is one that is impossible to answer since, well, I wasn’t part of his foursome on the day the deed was done.
There are two competing fact sets to think about when trying to make an educated guess on that question, though: 1) Trump is, by all accounts, a very good golfer and 2) Trump is a legendary cheater at golf.
On No. 1, there are lots of firsthand accounts of golf pros testifying to Trump’s skill at golf. Wrote Jaime Diaz, the former editor-in-chief of Golf World and senior writer at Golf Digest, of playing rounds with Trump in 2013 and 2014:
“Both our rounds came during openings of redesigns to his courses and were played casually, with plenty of putts inside five feet over-generously slapped away. But I certainly didn’t get the feeling that Trump shoots in the 70s only because he doesn’t putt the short ones. His ball-striking, from medium-length tees, made him a legitimate 4-handicap at the time.”
Trump’s quotes to Diaz about his self-taught golf swing are epic. “I think of golf as a very natural game,” Trump told Diaz. “I never really wanted to know a lot about my technique. I really trust instinct a lot, in golf and a lot of things.”
But then there is this counter-factual: Longtime sportswriter Rick Reilly has recently written an entire book about Trump’s golf-course cheating, titled: “Commander in Cheat: How Golf Explains Trump.”
Of Trump’s golfing, Reilly recently told CNN: “He cheats like a mafia accountant. He cheats crazy. He cheats whether you’re watching or not. He cheats whether you like it or not.” Reilly also told CNN that Trump hit two balls in the water when he played with Tiger Woods and then claimed to have almost beaten the pro.
To Reilly, Trump’s approach to golf is a window into his broader approach to life: He breaks all the rules and then denies, denies, denies. Whether or not you put that much stock in what golf can reveal about Trump, it’s clear that the President loves the sport and is — compared to other men his age — very good at it.
Is he “68” good? Uh…

Rep. Ian Mackey, a Democrat from St. Louis County, made an impassioned plea today on the Missouri House floor to strike down a bill that would ban abortions after eight weeks.

Mackey argued the bill violates basic rights in the Constitution.

“This is nothing but an affront not to Roe v. Wade, but to what it stands for: to the US Constitution itself,” he said. “The right to privacy in this country. Privacy from intrusion from your government.”

Mackey continued: “Today in this body, we, the government, us, right here, members are seizing every woman in this state. We are seizing her and we may as well be the ones tying her hands to the bed post and forcing her into childbirth.”

“Women brought all of us into this world, and I sure hope they vote all of us out,” he said.

According to the US Golf Association, Trump shot a 68 in April 2019. That’s a remarkable score for anyone who isn’t a professional golfer but a truly outstanding achievement for a 72-year-old man who also happens to be the President of the United States.
(Sidebar: It’s hard to pinpoint what exact date Trump shot the 68; he played twice at his club in West Palm Beach over Easter weekend — including a round with conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh and LPGA star Lexi Thompson — and four times at his club in Sterling, Virginia, according to CNN’s Betsy Klein.)

THE POINT — NOW ON YOUTUBE!

In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe!

That 68 appears to be Trump’s best round ever — or certainly within the last eight years. (Golf.com says Trump has never reported a score in the 60s before.) Trump, like most golfers, reports a chunk of his scores to the US Golf Association to maintain an official handicap (how many shots you, typically, shoot over par on a golf course.) The most recent score he reported before the April round of his life was in October 2018 when he shot a 96, which is, uh, less good.
In fact, of the last 20 rounds — dating back to 2011 — Trump has recorded with the USGA, his last two are the lowest and highest he has shot. Other than the 68 and the 96, Trump had 11 rounds in the 70s and 7 rounds in the 80s. His current handicap is 1.8, which is very, very good. Trump’s 1.8 handicap put him in the top 4% of all golfers who report handicap information, according, again, to the USGA.
The question everyone will ask — did Trump really shoot a 68 at age 72???? — is one that is impossible to answer since, well, I wasn’t part of his foursome on the day the deed was done.
There are two competing fact sets to think about when trying to make an educated guess on that question, though: 1) Trump is, by all accounts, a very good golfer and 2) Trump is a legendary cheater at golf.
On No. 1, there are lots of firsthand accounts of golf pros testifying to Trump’s skill at golf. Wrote Jaime Diaz, the former editor-in-chief of Golf World and senior writer at Golf Digest, of playing rounds with Trump in 2013 and 2014:
“Both our rounds came during openings of redesigns to his courses and were played casually, with plenty of putts inside five feet over-generously slapped away. But I certainly didn’t get the feeling that Trump shoots in the 70s only because he doesn’t putt the short ones. His ball-striking, from medium-length tees, made him a legitimate 4-handicap at the time.”
Trump’s quotes to Diaz about his self-taught golf swing are epic. “I think of golf as a very natural game,” Trump told Diaz. “I never really wanted to know a lot about my technique. I really trust instinct a lot, in golf and a lot of things.”
But then there is this counter-factual: Longtime sportswriter Rick Reilly has recently written an entire book about Trump’s golf-course cheating, titled: “Commander in Cheat: How Golf Explains Trump.”
Of Trump’s golfing, Reilly recently told CNN: “He cheats like a mafia accountant. He cheats crazy. He cheats whether you’re watching or not. He cheats whether you like it or not.” Reilly also told CNN that Trump hit two balls in the water when he played with Tiger Woods and then claimed to have almost beaten the pro.
To Reilly, Trump’s approach to golf is a window into his broader approach to life: He breaks all the rules and then denies, denies, denies. Whether or not you put that much stock in what golf can reveal about Trump, it’s clear that the President loves the sport and is — compared to other men his age — very good at it.
Is he “68” good? Uh…
The move would avert retaliatory tariffs Canada and Mexico had been considering to pressure Trump on the issue.
“Things are pretty much settled, but nothing is done until it’s done,” a second person familiar with the situation told CNN.
It also clears a key hurdle for ratification of Trump’s replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement.
Officials from Canada and Mexico have been adamant that they would not ratify the new US-Canada-Mexico Agreement, signed by leaders of all three countries late last year, until the metal tariffs were removed.
The tariffs, which were imposed last year on national security grounds, have been a source of consternation on Capitol Hill, with lawmakers from both parties calling on Trump to lift them.
The White House move comes after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reached out to Trump by phone three times in less than a week.
On Wednesday, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland met with US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer in Washington to try and hammer out the details.
This is a breaking story and will be updated.
In a newly released clip of a Fox News interview airing Sunday, Trump was asked whether he still wants to pursue a large infrastructure plan with Democrats even though Mulvaney threw cold water on the idea.
“Yeah, if Mick Mulvaney said that, then he has no right to say that. He tells me he didn’t say that and he didn’t mean it. He said it’s going to be hard to finance,” the President told “The Next Revolution” host Steve Hilton.
Democrats say $2 trillion for infrastructure agreed to after meeting with Trump

However, despite the President’s claim that Mulvaney hadn’t cast doubts on the plan, he did so on camera last month.
“Is this a real negotiation? I think it remains to be seen,” Mulvaney said at the Milken Institute in Beverly Hills referring to the infrastructure deal, adding, “I think there’s a much better chance of getting NAFTA passed than getting an infrastructure deal passed.”
The comment came as Democrats met with Trump and administration officials at the White House to discuss a potential infrastructure plan. Both parties suggested the meeting went well, but there hasn’t been much news on where the negotiations will go next.
Pressed further during the Fox News interview whether he’d still like to pursue an infrastructure plan with Democrats, Trump said he does want to move forward, but worried about raising taxes.
“I do, but I also think we’re being played by the Democrats a little bit,” he said. “You know, I think what they want me to do is say, ‘well what we’ll do is raise taxes, and we’ll do this and this and this,’ and then they’ll have a news conference — see, Trump wants to raise taxes. So it’s a little bit of a game.”

Rep. Ian Mackey, a Democrat from St. Louis County, made an impassioned plea today on the Missouri House floor to strike down a bill that would ban abortions after eight weeks.

Mackey argued the bill violates basic rights in the Constitution.

“This is nothing but an affront not to Roe v. Wade, but to what it stands for: to the US Constitution itself,” he said. “The right to privacy in this country. Privacy from intrusion from your government.”

Mackey continued: “Today in this body, we, the government, us, right here, members are seizing every woman in this state. We are seizing her and we may as well be the ones tying her hands to the bed post and forcing her into childbirth.”

“Women brought all of us into this world, and I sure hope they vote all of us out,” he said.

The Missouri Senate passed a bill early Thursday that prohibits abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy.

The bill, HB 126, is known as the “Missouri Stands for the Unborn Act.” It bans abortions after a heartbeat is detected. It allows exceptions for medical emergencies but not for pregnancies caused by rape or incest.

Many women often aren’t aware they’re pregnant in the first eight weeks.

The bill passed the GOP-controlled Senate 24-10. All of the “yay” votes were from Republican senators.

What happens next: The bill has to go back to the state House for one more vote before it goes to GOP Gov. Mike Parson.

Parson has voiced his support for the legislation, saying it would make Missouri “one of the strongest pro-life states” in the United States.

“I made a promise to all Missourians that I would continue advocating and promoting a culture of life here in Missouri,” Parson said at a news conference on Wednesday.

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Rep. Ian Mackey, a Democrat from St. Louis County, made an impassioned plea today on the Missouri House floor to strike down a bill that would ban abortions after eight weeks.

Mackey argued the bill violates basic rights in the Constitution.

“This is nothing but an affront not to Roe v. Wade, but to what it stands for: to the US Constitution itself,” he said. “The right to privacy in this country. Privacy from intrusion from your government.”

Mackey continued: “Today in this body, we, the government, us, right here, members are seizing every woman in this state. We are seizing her and we may as well be the ones tying her hands to the bed post and forcing her into childbirth.”

“Women brought all of us into this world, and I sure hope they vote all of us out,” he said.

The Vermont independent will call for a moratorium on the funding of all public charter schools until a national audit on the schools has been completed. Sanders will also promise to halt the use of public funds to underwrite all new charter schools if he is elected president.
A senior Sanders campaign official shared the details of policy proposal with CNN ahead of the Sanders speech in South Carolina — the crucial early primary state where the African-American vote is a key voting base. The moratorium on the funding of public charter schools was initially called for by the NAACP; Sanders will say in his speech that he supports the group’s efforts.
Sanders will also make the case that the growth of charter schools has done disproportionate harm to the black community because it has pulled public dollars away from community public schools.
He will give his speech in Orangeburg on the anniversary weekend of the historic Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision that ruled that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional.
Sanders is the first 2020 presidential candidate to call for such a ban. Several candidates have talked about general reform of the system. At a town hall on Monday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren answered a question about charter schools and said the focus should be on supporting existing public schools.
“I think that we need to support our public schools, and that no child should be left behind in a school that is not functional,” Warren said. “Our whole job in America should be to make sure that every child gets a good education in a public school.”
Sanders’ position is at odds with the Trump administration, which supports and promotes the public funding of charter schools. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has long been a strong proponent of the system and recently referred to opponents of charter schools as “flat earthers.”
“They will be hurting the children and families who can least afford it. If politicians in a state block education choice, it means those politicians do not support equal opportunity for all kids,” DeVos said.
According to the campaign, Sanders will outline a series of reforms he deems necessary to charter school policy. Among them:
  • Mandating that charter schools comply with the same oversight requirements as public schools
  • Mandating that at least half of all charter school boards are teachers and parents
  • Disclosing student attrition rates, non-public funding sources, financial interests and other relevant data
  • Matching employment practices at charters with neighboring district schools, including standards set by collective bargaining agreements and restrictions on exorbitant CEO pay
  • Supporting the efforts of charter school teachers to unionize and bringing charter schools to the negotiating table
Sanders will concede that the initial goal of charter schools — to help kids with unique learning needs — was admirable. But he will argue the system has been corrupted by wealthy activists who spent millions to privatize these schools, leaving them unaccountable and draining funds from the public school system.
Those who operate these schools feel differently. Shaelyn Macedonio, a spokesperson from the National Alliance For Public Charter Schools, points out that three California Branches of the NAACP broke with the national organization’s call for a moratorium on funding. She noted that there was evidence that charter schools have helped thousands of children in at-risk situations.