Some accounts called protesters “cockroaches” or compared them to Islamic State terrorists. All the offending accounts have been taken down from Twitter and Facebook.
Twitter said it identified a network of more than 900 accounts that “were deliberately and specifically attempting to sow political discord in Hong Kong, including undermining the legitimacy and political positions of the protest movement on the ground.”
The man taking on Hong Kong from deep inside China's propaganda machine

This is the first time tech companies have pointed the finger at Beijing for covert efforts to influence messaging around the Hong Kong protests. Democracy demonstrators have massed throughout Hong Kong for 11 consecutive weekends.
An account that was titled “Dream News” tweeted about the demonstrators, “We don’t want you radical people in Hong Kong. Just get out of here!”
The accounts posted in multiple languages and at least some of them appeared to target American audiences. One account, that was set up more than 10 years ago, said in its Twitter bio, “Conservative News from the USA and Abroad. #Catholic Defender of the Constitution of the United States.” The account claimed to support President Donald Trump.
Other accounts also purported to be operated by people in the United States, listing locations like Chicago and Long Beach, California.
Twitter initially identified the network and shared details about the accounts with Facebook. Then, Facebook identified about a dozen pages, accounts and groups that were tied to the operation.
“Although the people behind this activity attempted to conceal their identities, our investigation found links to individuals associated with the Chinese government,” Nathaniel Gleicher, Facebook’s head of cybersecurity policy, wrote in a blog post.
The Facebook pages were followed by about 15,000 accounts, the company said.
Twitter said many of the accounts accessed its platform using virtual private networks because Twitter is blocked in China.
China, of course, is not alone in using social media to spread unrest. Covert campaigns have been tied to Russia and Iran, among other countries.
In 2018 the U.S. Department of Justice brought charges against a Kremlin-linked troll group that had posed as American on social media in the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election.
“We will begin by taking that picture of Andrew Jackson off the wall of the Oval Office,” the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate told the Native American audience at the Frank LaMere Presidential Candidate Forum. “I am not a Native American woman, but I find it one of the greatest insults. You will not be insulted. You will be more than not insulted. If I am President of the United States, there will be a level of atonement, there will be a level of making amends.”
Jackson, the nation’s seventh president, long garnered praise as the son of immigrants who was elected to the highest office in the land after fighting in the War of 1812. But he also had harsh anti-Native American policies, including the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The act eventually led to the forced relocation of Native Americans from their native Georgia to Oklahoma, killing thousands of Cherokees along what became known as the Trail of Tears.
Jackson has long been one of President Donald Trump’s favorite presidents. Trump told NBC News in 2016, “Andrew Jackson had a great history” of “tremendous success for the country.” He dismissed a move to replace the controversial president on the $20 bill with abolitionist Harriet Tubman as “pure political correctness.”
For her part, Williamson reiterated her pledge after her remarks, telling reporters anyone with “just a base level of knowledge of American history” should be familiar with Jackson’s role in the Trail of Tears.
“It is one of the great shames, the great pockmarks on the heart of the psyche of American history,” Williamson said. “This is not a president who should be shown the honor of his portrait hanging in the Oval Office.”
State law previously allowed the use of extreme force when attempting to arrest someone or prevent them from escaping. The law comes as Democratic and progressive lawmakers and activists in the state look for ways to rein in police following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in Sacramento last year.
“(The legislation is) important because we can’t accept the status quo. The idea that over 100 people — 162 people in 2017 — were killed in police shootings in the state of California is unacceptable. It’s not good for law enforcement and it’s certainly not good for individuals in the communities that have been disproportionately impacted,” Gov. Gavin Newsom told CNN’s Van Jones in an interview that aired on “Newsroom.”
A legislative compromise could spur California to pass the strictest police deadly-force bill in the country

“I just can’t sit by and watch another 100 human beings — another 150 human beings lose their lives to excessive force,” added Newsom, who described the measure as being “profoundly significant.”
The legislation, which cleared the California state Senate last month and was passed by the state’s assembly in late May, says when possible, officers must use “other available resources and techniques” to address threats instead of using deadly force. Its approval raises California’s deadly force standard to one of the highest in the nation.
The measure’s final hurdle was cleared nearly six months after a prosecutor in Sacramento announced she would not be filing charges against two police officers who killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was fatally shot in his grandmother’s backyard last year. Officers killed Clark after chasing him to the backyard; the prosecutor later described Clark as taking a shooting stance and officers firing after they saw a flash of light that one believed came from a gun. A cell phone was found underneath Clark’s body.
The case reflected and further strained relations between the police and the community as well as racial tensions in the state capital and inspired the bill’s writing.
Clark’s death “just ignited a new resolve with a new administration (with) a fresh set of eyes and a desire to say, ‘you know what, we’re better than this,'” Newsom said. The governor did not say whether he believes the proposed changes would have had prevented Clark’s death.
No charges for Sacramento officers who fatally shot Stephon Clark

No charges for Sacramento officers who fatally shot Stephon Clark

Geoffrey Alpert, a professor of criminology at the University of South Carolina and an expert on use of force, told CNN on Monday that while he supports the legislation, an emphasis should be placed on officers’ training and what options they have when faced with a potentially dangerous situation.
“The thing police have to do is really dig into the training, dig into the scenarios and make sure officers know how to respond,” Alpert said. He added that based on the law’s language, it will be the “strongest” in the country, but that “time will tell what it means” and it could face legal challenges.
Several California police groups, including the Los Angeles Police Protective League, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Employees’ Benefit Association and Protect California praised the move by Newsom, saying the new standards “emphasize de-escalation of volatile situations and a reverence for life.”
In a separate joint statement, the California Police Chiefs Association, the Peace Officers Research Association of California and the California Association of Highway Patrolmen said the success of the new law “hinges on the passage” of a bill in the state legislature that would provide funding for law enforcement tools and more police training.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California also welcomed the new law, with Peter Bibring, an attorney for the group, telling CNN that the measure “is about a simple rule — police shouldn’t take a life if they have other alternatives.”
The victim was working at the international student affairs office as a retired annuitant, officials said.
The unidentified man, in his late 50s, had multiple stab wounds and was found in a vehicle in a campus parking lot.
He was pronounced dead at the scene.
There is a belief that the victim was targeted, said Fullerton police Lt. Jon Radus. The city’s police force is leading the investigation. No motive was disclosed.
Classes at the Southern California school start on Saturday.
The will, which is dated August 8 — two days before Epstein was found dead by suicide in a federal jail in New York — lists assets that he left to Mark Epstein, according to The Post.
Among the assets, the will lists more than $56 million in cash and another $14 million in fixed income investments.
Epstein’s cause of death was suicide by hanging, the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said Friday.
The multimillionaire financier had been jailed since early July, when he pleaded not guilty to charges by New York federal prosecutors after an indictment accused him of running a sex trafficking ring of underage girls, some as young as 14. He was set to go to trial next year.
State law previously allowed the use of extreme force when attempting to arrest someone or prevent them from escaping. The law comes as Democratic and progressive lawmakers and activists in the state look for ways to rein in police following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in Sacramento last year.
“(The legislation is) important because we can’t accept the status quo. The idea that over 100 people — 162 people in 2017 — were killed in police shootings in the state of California is unacceptable. It’s not good for law enforcement and it’s certainly not good for individuals in the communities that have been disproportionately impacted,” Gov. Gavin Newsom told CNN’s Van Jones in an interview that aired on “Newsroom.”
A legislative compromise could spur California to pass the strictest police deadly-force bill in the country

“I just can’t sit by and watch another 100 human beings — another 150 human beings lose their lives to excessive force,” added Newsom, who described the measure as being “profoundly significant.”
The legislation, which cleared the California state Senate last month and was passed by the state’s assembly in late May, says when possible, officers must use “other available resources and techniques” to address threats instead of using deadly force. Its approval raises California’s deadly force standard to one of the highest in the nation.
The measure’s final hurdle was cleared nearly six months after a prosecutor in Sacramento announced she would not be filing charges against two police officers who killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man who was fatally shot in his grandmother’s backyard last year. Officers killed Clark after chasing him to the backyard; the prosecutor later described Clark as taking a shooting stance and officers firing after they saw a flash of light that one believed came from a gun. A cell phone was found underneath Clark’s body.
The case reflected and further strained relations between the police and the community as well as racial tensions in the state capital and inspired the bill’s writing.
Clark’s death “just ignited a new resolve with a new administration (with) a fresh set of eyes and a desire to say, ‘you know what, we’re better than this,'” Newsom said. The governor did not say whether he believes the proposed changes would have had prevented Clark’s death.
No charges for Sacramento officers who fatally shot Stephon Clark

No charges for Sacramento officers who fatally shot Stephon Clark

Geoffrey Alpert, a professor of criminology at the University of South Carolina and an expert on use of force, told CNN on Monday that while he supports the legislation, an emphasis should be placed on officers’ training and what options they have when faced with a potentially dangerous situation.
“The thing police have to do is really dig into the training, dig into the scenarios and make sure officers know how to respond,” Alpert said. He added that based on the law’s language, it will be the “strongest” in the country, but that “time will tell what it means” and it could face legal challenges.
Several California police groups, including the Los Angeles Police Protective League, Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Employees’ Benefit Association and Protect California praised the move by Newsom, saying the new standards “emphasize de-escalation of volatile situations and a reverence for life.”
In a separate joint statement, the California Police Chiefs Association, the Peace Officers Research Association of California and the California Association of Highway Patrolmen said the success of the new law “hinges on the passage” of a bill in the state legislature that would provide funding for law enforcement tools and more police training.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California also welcomed the new law, with Peter Bibring, an attorney for the group, telling CNN that the measure “is about a simple rule — police shouldn’t take a life if they have other alternatives.”

A Utah businessman paid $1.32 million for a dime last week at a Chicago coin auction.

It wasn’t just any 10-cent piece; the 1894-S Barber Dime is one of only 24 that were ever made, according to Stack’s Bowers Galleries, which held the auction Thursday night.

Only nine of the coins are confirmed to still exist.

The coin was purchased by Dell Loy Hansen, who also owns the Real Salt Lake MLS team.

Hansen is an avid coin collector and is working toward a collection that includes an example of every coin ever made by the US Mint from 1792 to the present, said John Brush, president of David Lawrence Rare Coins, who is helping Hansen curate his collection and was in Chicago to bid on the dime.

“When you’re bidding a million dollars on a coin, it’s nerve-wracking,” Brush said. “You kind of get the sweaty palms, because that’s a lot of money.”

Brush said Hansen needs only six coins to complete his collection, but they are not available for sale.

The 1894-S is known as a Barber Dime because it was designed by engraver Charles E. Barber, who designed many coins for US Mints.
The coins were struck at the San Francisco Mint on June 9, 1894, the Professional Coin Grading Service said in a statement. The service certified the coin’s condition and authenticity.

The dime once belonged to Jerry Buss, the late owner of the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers. It last went up for auction in 1988.

Another 1894-S dime sold in 2016 to an anonymous buyer for almost $2 million.
“It’s the people that pull the trigger, not the gun that pulls the trigger so we have a very, very big mental health problem, and Congress is working on various things and I will be looking at it,” Trump said Sunday in New Jersey.
His comments seemed to signal a backtrack from his openness to a new, more universal background-check system and a new focus on putting people with mental health problems into institutions.
But even mental health experts who agree that the move to eliminate psychiatric beds has gone too far say that putting people back in institutions would do nothing to curb gun violence.
Dominic Sisti is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania who co-wrote a paper titled “Bring Back the Asylum” in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2015, but he said on Monday that the President was “proposing an idea without any actual evidence or background knowledge.”
Sisti has argued that the so-called “deinstitutionalization” movement has gone too far but said reversing it isn’t the answer to America’s mass shootings.
“We do need more mental health beds to help people with mental illnesses,” said Sisti in an email. “However, the dearth of such beds is not the cause of mass shootings, nor will increases in beds be the solution.”
He pointed to research he published in June with Isabel Parera, also at Penn, on institutionalization in other countries.
“We show that many other countries closed psychiatric institutions during the period of deinstitutionalization. None even come close to the US in mass shooting frequency.”
Trump has repeatedly spoken positively about the system of institutions, which was dismantled in part because of terrible abuse of patients as well as advances in treatment.
“These are people that have to be in institutions for help — I’m not talking about as a form of a prison, I’m saying for help — and I think it’s something we have to really look at, the whole concept of mental institutions,” Trump said. “I remember growing up we had mental institutions, then they were closed — in New York, I’m talking about — they were, many of them, closed. A lot of them were closed and all of those people were put out on the street.”
Trump made similar comments after the shooting at Majory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida killed 17 people in 2018 and also in 2017 after it was learned that the man who killed 26 people at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, had years before escaped from a psychiatric hospital while he was in the Air Force.
But mental health advocates see deinstitutionalization in the US very differently than Trump. The reason the institutions were closed was because they didn’t work, according to Chuck Ingoglia, the president and CEO of the National Council for Behavioral Health.
“Let’s be perfectly clear,” he said in a statement. “The president is suggesting we return to an era of forcibly warehousing people with serious mental illness. The nation tried that approach and, rightfully abandoned it decades ago because it did not work.”
There has been a long-term effort to deinstitutionalize mental health treatment in the US and rely more on community-based treatment rather than long stays at psychiatric hospitals.
“It did not work because it was applying a criminal solution to a health problem,” Ingoglia said. “And it did not work because it robbed people of their dignity. People living with serious mental illness need and deserve quality mental health treatment.”
He said people with mental illness shouldn’t be turned into scapegoats for the problem of mass violence. And he’s lobbying for more funding for community behavioral health clinics.
There has certainly been a decline in the number of beds at mental institutions. But the problem for Trump is that despite his rhetoric in favor of more mental health treatment, he’s tried to slash funding for Medicaid, which provides mental health treatment to a large percentage of Americans who need it.
And often, people with severe mental health issues end up in prison or homeless.
After the shootings earlier this month in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, the American Psychiatric Association issued a statement calling the gun violence a public health crisis that needs attention. But the statement warned about the effects of stigmatizing people with mental illness.
The association, too, called for additional funding for mental health programs.
“Mental health programs are severely underfunded in this country and access to needed care is challenging for individuals and families,” according to its statement. “It is important to note that the overwhelming majority of people with mental illness are not violent and far more likely to be victims of violent crime than perpetrators of violence. Rhetoric that argues otherwise will further stigmatize and interfere with people accessing needed treatment. Individuals can also be emboldened to act violently by the public discourse and divisive rhetoric. “
After thanking New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland, who had vigorously defended her minutes earlier, the Massachusetts senator quickly addressed her past claims to tribal heritage. Warren had drawn criticism over her decision last year to release the results of a DNA test that showed distant Native American ancestry. In the aftermath of that, she apologized, in public and private.
On Monday, she did so again.
“Like anyone who’s being honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes. I am sorry for harm I have caused,” the 2020 Democratic presidential candidate said. “I have listened and I have learned — a lot. And I am grateful for the many conversations that we’ve had together.”
The audience had heard enough and applauded as Warren finished her thought and promised to continue her long partnership with Native communities “as President of the United States of America.” Over the next 20 minutes, at least two of the questioners onstage would say they hoped for the chance, one day soon, to address her by that title.
Warren’s rise in the Democratic primary has been built on a combination of detailed policy plans and her relentless engagement with voters and local leaders. At the Frank LaMere Presidential Candidate Forum here, she leaned on both, again showing off her fluency on the core issue at stake for this audience — federal policy concerning Native Americans, and the many ways in which the government has let down or betrayed tribes. Warren’s release last week of a new suite of policy plans and draft legislation, crafted with Haaland, seemed to speak on its own to many of the questions in Sioux City.
In her introduction, Haaland, who has endorsed Warren, called the media’s focus on President Donald Trump’s insults — and the speculation over what they meant for Warren’s campaign — a political gift to Trump.
“Every time they asked about Elizabeth’s family instead of the issues of vital importance to Indian country, they feed the President’s racism,” Haaland said. “Elizabeth knows she will be attacked, but she’s here to be an unwavering partner in our struggle, because that is what a leader does.”
Both the leaders up on stage and the audience seemed to agree. Warren was greeted warmly and she cycled seamlessly between notes of empathy and her case for the “structural change” needed to benefit and revive Native communities. She talked about directing new resources to tribes and guaranteeing them broader jurisdiction on their own lands. On the question of missing and murdered indigenous women — and men, Warren noted — the issue needs more attention from the government and the national media, she said.
“A problem that is not seen,” she said, “is a problem that is not fixed.”
Manape LaMere, son of the late Frank LaMere — the activist after whom the conference is named, told CNN after Warren spoke that he appreciated her focus on policies important to Native people.
“I hope that people can pay attention to what she’s saying about her policies — she seems to have a pretty, pretty good pulse on at least the legal understanding,” LaMere said.
As for Warren’s mea culpa for her handling of her own family’s ancestry, LaMere said he accepted the apology and that he was not interested in discussing it further: “We all make mistakes and if we’re able to hold ourselves accountable to people, that’s fine. That’s what we’re supposed to be doing.”
The conference — and the fact that several top-tier presidential candidates are attending it this week — was his father’s dream, LaMere added.
“We’re forgotten and so I loved to see how Dad has encouraged us to come together and we’re checking off a dream,” he said. “Posthumously, we’re checking off a dream of his.”
The desire to see Native issues given more attention was a consistent message across the morning and into the afternoon.
After Warren’s session, Aric Armell, who came to Sioux City from his home in Winnebago, Nebraska, where he is an enrolled tribal member, said the forum was just a beginning. He wanted to hear more from Warren — and all the candidates — and not just at a one-off event.
“A lot of the topics that came up don’t normally get a chance to come out. For a lot of the candidates today, for them to speak on that, it was really good to hear,” Armell said.
Warren, he added, seemed to have “skimmed over” the issue of her ancestry. But Arnell wasn’t too bothered. Like so many others here, he was looking farther down the road.
“I think what she had to say is really good for Indian country. Her track record speaks to all that,” he said. “If she’s the president, we’ve got a good foundation with her already.”
Christina Lester, the former teacher, and June Yurish and Kristin Douty, former aides, were charged with misdemeanor failure to report abuse or neglect, according to a press release from West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey.
Amber Pack was concerned when her daughter Adri came home with bruises from Berkeley Heights Elementary in October. The marks appeared to be pressure bruises from tight grips, said Ben Salango, an attorney for the Pack family.
Adri was nonverbal, but she would cry getting on the bus and didn’t want to leave the house. It was clear she didn’t want to go to school, the attorney said.
Pack bought a recording device and put it in Adri’s hair bun.
“She was absolutely shocked by what she heard,” Salango told CNN.
The teacher and aides at the Martinsburg school threatened Adri and other children, telling them they would hit them in the face and knock their teeth out, and they threatened to withhold food, Salango said.
“These arrests send a strong message — that child abuse will not be tolerated and must be reported,” Attorney General Patrick Morrisey said in a statement. “We must continue working to ensure vulnerable children are protected, especially at school.”
The attorney general filed a civil lawsuit in February that accused Lester, Yurish and Douty of verbally abusing the students by threatening physical violence. The comments on the recording “include threats of violence, verbal abuse and other outrages,” according to the complaint.
The investigation led Morrisey to make criminal referrals to the prosecutor, the statement said.
The civil complaint was amended in May to include the principal, Amber Boeckmann, and the county’s deputy superintendent, Margaret F. Kursey, alleging they “actively tried to obscure evidence with a flawed investigation,” according to the attorney general’s office.
The Berkeley County Board of Education was also added as a defendant in the amended civil complaint as “it bears responsibility because those committing the allegations did so during the course of their employment with the board.”
CNN has reached out to the former teacher, aides, principal, deputy superintendent and the school district for comment. Attorney Christian Riddell, who represents former aides Yurish and Douty, told CNN affiliate WJLA that they have “no comment at this time.”
Salango said the Pack family is “very happy” that charges have been filed against the teacher and the two aides.
“We’re pleased that the prosecutor took her time, did a thorough investigation and decided to arrest the three individuals this morning,” the attorney said. “We’ve had faith in the system from the beginning and look forward to a disposition of criminal proceedings.”
Adri now happily goes to school, the attorney said.
“She’s in a new school and is in a loving environment and doing much better,” Salango said.