“This decision was an incredibly difficult one for Sam and the family, but because the plea agreement includes no jail time and no admission of facts, it was decided the plea deal is in the best interests of the family,” his attorney Michael Winkleman said in a statement obtained by CNN.
Authorities in Puerto Rico charged Anello with negligent homicide in October, alleging that he dropped his granddaughter, Chloe Wiegand, from an open window on the 11th floor of the cruise ship in July.
He was scheduled to be tried by a judge in April. A hearing addressing his plea change has yet to be set, Winkleman said.
Attorney Michael Winkleman, who has been retained by the Wiegand family following the death of their toddler, Chloe on the Royal Caribbean cruise ship, said the tragic accident could have been prevented.

The details of Chloe’s death have been in dispute since the accident.
Port Authority officials said Anello sat the girl in the window on the 11th deck of the Freedom of the Seas ship and lost his balance, and the girl fell to her death.
A wrongful death lawsuit filed against the ship’s operator, Royal Caribbean Cruises, on behalf of the family, says Anello was supervising Chloe when she wandered to a floor-to-ceiling wall of windows.
She asked to be lifted up to bang on the glass, the suit said, so Anello held her up and she leaned forward. She then slipped through his hands and through the open pane, falling 150 feet onto the San Juan Pier, according to the suit.
The family claims that the glass panes on the deck can be slid open by any passenger, and the walls didn’t contain warnings that the panes could open. Anello told CBS News he wouldn’t have placed the toddler near the window if he’d known it was open.
“This (change of plea) doesn’t have any impact on the lawsuit against Royal Caribbean,” Winkleman said. “We still maintain this was a tragic, preventable accident that never would have occurred if Royal Caribbean followed the industry-standard window fall prevention codes that are designed for the singular purpose of preventing children from falling out of windows.”
Chloe’s mother, Kimberly Wiegand, has said she supports her stepfather.
“I want to be clear and unequivocal: We do not support this misdemeanor charge or any charges whatsoever,” Wiegand said. “Our family has already lost everything; what purpose could possibly be served by prosecuting a misdemeanor offense?”
The “Mercy” singer said she still wasn’t sure now was the right time to share but that it felt “liberating” to do so.
“Many of you wonder what happened to me, where did I disappear to and why,” she wrote. “The truth is, and please trust me I am ok and safe now, I was raped and drugged and held captive over some days.”
Duffy says she survived and spent “thousands and thousands of days … committed to wanting to feel the sunshine in my heart again.”
“You wonder why I did not choose to use my voice to express my pain? I did not want to show the world the sadness in my eyes. I asked myself, how can I sing from the heart if it is broken? And slowly it unbroke.”
Duffy took home the Best Pop Vocal Album award at the 2009 Grammys for her breakthrough album, “Rockferry.” That same year, she was also nominated for Best New Artist.
In 2010, she released another album, “Endlessly,” after which she largely retreated from the music scene.
The Welsh artist said that in the coming weeks she’ll post a spoken interview in which she will also address fan questions.
She closed by saying, “Please respect this is a gentle move for me to make, for myself, and I do not want any intrusion to my family. Please support me to make this a positive experience.”
On social media, fans commended the singer for her bravery.
“Wow, your strength is truly inspiring,” one user wrote on Instagram.
“Your music is a reflection of your heart and who you are, beautiful and strong. I pray and hope for a real and long lasting healing,” another fan wrote. “We are with you dear, precious @duffy you are incredible and very missed. Fight this thing, don’t let it define you or determine your life.”
“Help me,” Kaia says between sobs as her hands are restrained with a zip tie.
“You can tell me what happened in the car, OK?” one officer responds as he begins to walk her outside.
“I don’t want to go to the police car,” Kaia said while she wept. “Please.”
“Please, please,” Kaia continued to sob as an officer put her in the back of his police SUV. “Please let me go.”
CNN does not normally identify juveniles in such cases, but the family has spoken openly about her.
The videos show one officer going back into the office and chatting with several office staff members. He told them that he had arrested 6,000 people in 28 years and that Kaia had “broken the record,” because until that day the youngest person he had arrested had been 7.
Two body camera videos of the incident were released to CNN Tuesday by the Smith & Eulo Law Firm, the attorneys representing Kaia Rolle. But the arrest happened on September 19, 2019, following what had reportedly been a temper tantrum by Kaia at The Lucious and Emma Nixon Academy.

Assistant principal took Kaia to the office

According to written statements made by the principal, the assistant principal and two school staff members in September 2019 and obtained by CNN, the incident began at about 8:10 a.m. Kaia Rolle was screaming and pulling on a classroom door because she wanted to wear her sunglasses.
The assistant principal observed this and led Kaia to the office while the child was “kicking and screaming.”
“Kaia became aggressive hitting me with her hands in the chest and stomach area,” the assistant principal wrote in the statement. “I restrained her by holding her forearms.”
Meralyn Kirkland, the child’s grandmother, told CNN Kaia had been acting out because she was experiencing the side effects from sleep apnea, that the school was aware of the issues and that the family was working to get the issues resolved.
From the statements, it’s unclear when exactly the resource officer was called to intervene. But the statements from one staff member and the school principal reference interactions between Kaia and the resource officer.
The school resource officer tried to “calm her but Kaia would not listen,” said a staff member.
“He tried to get her to sit down but she wouldn’t,” the principal’s statement said. Portions of the principal’s handwritten statement are hard to decipher. Like this one: “He told her that he would take her to ja__ if she didn’t stop misbehaving and hitting.”
At one point, the officer asked administrators to call Kaia’s family. “After about 10 minutes [the principal] was able to calm Kaia down,” the statement from the staff member read.
The videos released to CNN by the family attorney start off with Kaia Rolle calmly reading a book with a teacher in an office and do not show the temper tantrum described in the handwritten statements.
While the police report says the assistant principal wanted to press charges and would testify in court, the statement the assistant principal gave to police at the time and obtained by CNN does not show an initial by the box: “I will testify in court and prosecute criminally.”
In a statement issued by Lucious and Emma Nixon Academy on September 24, 2019, Kaia’s school wrote, “Never did anyone within our organization request or direct the School Resource Officer to arrest this student.” CNN reached out to the school Tuesday asking for comment regarding the release of the videos and has not heard back.

One of the officers has been terminated

The Orlando Police Department apologized to the family and terminated one of the two police officers in the videos, shortly after reviewing the incident in September 2019. The second officer in the videos was “exonerated” after an “investigation revealed that he notified his supervisor multiple times about concerns with the arrest but was never given instruction not to proceed with the prisoner transport.”
And in a statement to CNN at the time Orlando Police said, “the arrest of any person under the age of 12 requires the approval of the Watch Commander, which was not obtained in this case.” The statement went on to say, “The 6-year-old was released from custody and returned to the school prior to being processed at the Juvenile Assessment Center.”
CNN tried to obtain the records independently from the Orlando Police Department and was sent a statement saying the “records remain confidential and exempt from disclosure as a public record.”
“These statutes were written with the intent to protect juvenile subjects from unwanted disclosure of their information,” the statement attributed to the Orlando Police Legal Advisor Alex Karden said.
The statement from police also referenced that the former school resource officer had arrested another child in a separate incident. In 2019, Orlando Police Chief Orlando Rolon spoke briefly about the arresting officer’s history, which included a personal incident involving his own children years ago. But Rolon said he could not go into the details.
CNN has reached out to the former school resource officer for comment and has not been able to reach him.
State Attorney Aramis Ayala did not pursue the misdemeanor battery charges against the child and during a press conference in September said, “Very young children ought to be protected, nurtured and disciplined in a manner that does not rely on the criminal justice system.”

Family wants to change Florida law

Kaia Rolle’s family debated for almost a month about whether to release the body camera videos, according to Smith & Eulo Law Firm, the attorneys representing Rolle.
Their biggest worry, the law firm says, was that Kaia would have to re-live the nightmare given that she is still “traumatized” and in “therapy.
“It’s tough for her to go to school. Every time she sees an officer she freaks out,” a member of the Smith & Eulo Law Firm told CNN.
But ultimately the family decided to release the videos for at least three reasons, explained the firm.
First, the family felt it was important for the public to see the “severity” of what actually happened.
Second, the family would like the Orlando Police Department to acknowledge they dropped the ball when they decided to arrest a child.
And finally, the family would like to draw attention to the case because they want to rally support for a bill going through the Florida legislature that would raise the arrest age to 12. Senate Bill 578 was introduced January 14 by state Sen. Randolph Bracy III.

The child still has nightmares

Kaia’s grandmother told CNN by phone that she is speaking out in support of the bill because she doesn’t want another child to suffer the trauma of getting handcuffed and put in the back of a police car — as the videos of her granddaughter’s arrest so vividly shows.
“I’m really hurt because they stole her childhood from her,” Kirkland said.
Kirkland says that for a week and a half following the arrest, Kaia would not leave her side. And the first time she tried taking her to school, Kaia had a meltdown inside the car as they drove up to campus because she saw a uniformed officer on the grounds.
“Grandma they are waiting to arrest me again,” Kirkland remembers Kaia saying between sobs.
Kirkland called a therapist who recommended Kaia not be forced to go to any school with a uniformed police officer.
With a 2019 Florida law mandating that a uniformed police be present at every public school in the state, Kirkland says she was forced to find a private school for Kaia. But Kirkland says she couldn’t afford to pay for private school. After four months and thanks to a scholarship, Kirkland says she shored up enough money to have Kaia attend private school with no resource officer on campus.
While Kaia sleeps well now after undergoing surgery for sleep apnea in October, Kirkland says that her granddaughter still has nightmares.
While President Donald Trump is reassuring the nation that the virus is “going to go away” and is “very well under control,” experts in his government are painting a far more dire picture.
A top US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccination expert warned Tuesday that the virus could bring severe disruption to American life and told people to get ready now.
The disconnect between Dr. Nancy Messonnier’s comments and Trump’s stance raised the question of how the President will respond, given his history of turning on officials who contradict his views with evidence-based reasoning.
Nervousness on Capitol Hill was exacerbated by a string of developments that appeared to reflect Messonnier’s assessment of the situation better than the President’s rosier commentary. The CDC said Tuesday night that coronavirus was not recognized to be spreading inside the United States. It said if sustained transmission did occur, its strategy would call on those infected to stay home from work. School dismissals and the cancellation of mass meetings might be necessary as well as telecommuting for office workers.
The mayor of San Francisco declared a state of emergency to prepare for the possible arrival of the virus. Questions about the government’s capacity to monitor widespread outbreaks deepened when it emerged that only 12 state and local health laboratories can test for Covid-19. Another stocks sell-off provoked by concern about the disease’s quickening wiped another 900 points from the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Trump’s assurance that a vaccine is close appeared to be born from the same sense of hope that led him to predict that warming temperatures in the spring will snuff out the virus.
To date, there are 57 recorded cases of coronavirus in the United States, including 40 passengers who were aboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan, three people who were brought home from China and 14 other patients. Meanwhile, the virus is grabbing a stronger foothold in Europe and Asia.
So far, Trump’s political interests appear to have led the President to seek to minimize the threat from the virus and the chances of it evolving into an epidemic on American soil.
But fast-moving developments mean that Trump looks behind the curve of the growing threat to the United States — a dangerous position for a President who is seeking a second term. Democrats, apparently looking for vulnerabilities, are warning that his administration is asleep as a possible pandemic builds.
In the next few days, the President’s political interests may dictate a far more proactive attitude, given that a crisis that rages out of control could taint his White House with a reputation for incompetence.

Behind the scenes, the President is frustrated

Privately, the President may have come to that conclusion already. CNN reported Tuesday that Trump was becoming frustrated with his administration’s response to the situation and that officials were beginning to acknowledge that the epidemic was going to become a greater problem than first thought.
Given the torrent of foreboding news, as coronavirus emerged as a greater threat in Europe and the global death toll reached 2,763, Trump’s upbeat assessment delivered in New Delhi appeared to have aged badly.
The President said the coronavirus situation was “very well under control in our country.” And he added “that whole situation will start working out.” Trump also hit at Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, who blasted the White House’s emergency $1.25 billion funding request as “too little, too late.”
On Air Force One, Trump tweeted that “if I asked for more he would say it is too much. He didn’t like my early travel closings. I was right. He is incompetent!”
Other White House officials tried to play down a building sense of dread — an important role in a time of crisis — as long as such confidence reflects reality.
Top White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on CNBC that the virus was “very contained” in the United States and that health experts were prepared for all eventualities. The administration says it has got its best brains working on the virus and said Trump has taken part in multiple meetings and briefings on the situation.
“I would echo the words of the WHO that said don’t overreact. My own view is don’t panic. I’m an old guy, been around a long time, I’ve seen these things come and go,” Kudlow said.
Schumer said that he hoped that the administration’s optimistic forecasts about the coronavirus situation were not intended to juice stocks but added: “When Larry Kudlow says it’s contained you get to wonder what the motivation is.”
The message coming from appointees in the government’s health infrastructure is far less reassuring than that voiced by Trump’s political subordinates in the West Wing.
“The data over the past week about the spread in other countries has raised our level of concern and expectation that we are going to have community spread here,”the CDC’s Messonnier told reporters on a conference call.
Messonnier said it was not known when coronavirus would take root in the US and how dangerous it might be. But she warned: “Disruption to everyday life might be severe,” adding that schools and families should begin to prepare now.
“It’s not so much a question of if this will happen any more, but rather, more a question of exactly when this will happen and how many people in this country will have severe illness.”

Concern on both sides of the aisle

Concern about coronavirus is becoming one of the rare issues that crosses party lines in polarized Washington.
Republican Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana confronted the acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf about the virus in the Senate Appropriations sub-committee.
“You’re supposed to keep us safe. The American people deserve some straight answers on the coronavirus and I’m not getting them from you,” Kennedy said, after asking about transmission of the disease and levels of preparedness.
Wolf told reporters after the hearing that his department was “extremely focused.”
“We’re implementing a number of operational measures at airports, seaports and land ports of entry,” he said.
Senators attended a classified briefing on Tuesday morning with DHS, HHS and CDC officials about the progress of a vaccine, supply chain issues and the possibility of a spike in cases of coronavirus within US borders.
But senators in both parties cast doubt on the readiness of the administration.
“It’s completely inadequate to the threat that exists. A real, present danger of outbreaks in the United States,” Connecticut Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal said.
But a series of narrower fights might have mattered even more, as everyone in the field vies to emerge as the lone challenger to Sanders with time running out: South Carolina’s primary is Saturday and Super Tuesday, when 14 states and American Samoa vote, is three days later.
Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s approach was clearest: precise, selective swings at Sanders; damn the torpedoes against former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Former Vice President Joe Biden and billionaire businessman Tom Steyer fought over their records on race, courting a much narrower audience: the African American voters who will make up more than half the electorate in South Carolina.
Among Biden’s competitors in the moderate lane, former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg tried to hammer Sanders all night — talking over his answers repeatedly in his most aggressive debate performance yet. And Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar stayed above the fray, instead offering herself as an above-it-all alternative to the food fight viewers were watching.
Here are eight takeaways from the 10th Democratic presidential debate Tuesday night in Charleston:

Sanders gets front-runner treatment

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Warren set the tone. Bloomberg followed, then Buttigieg, then Biden.
By the end of the first half-hour, everyone onstage had taken a whack at Sanders. Their aim was clear: knock him off his pedestal.
Whether they hit the mark is another question.
Bloomberg said Sanders was a weak general election candidate, which is why “Russia is trying to get (him) elected.” Warren accused Sanders’ team of “trashing” her over her plan to pay for “Medicare for All.” Buttigieg scoffed at Sanders’ calls for political revolution when — in refusing to blow up the Senate filibuster — he won’t make “a rule change.” Biden again slammed Sanders over his votes against the Brady Act, which mandated a waiting period on handgun purchases.
Sanders was also put on the defensive by the moderators, who questioned his past support for legislation that protects gun manufacturers from lawsuits, his comments — recently and going back decades — about Cuba and whether he was sufficiently pro-Israel.
In front of an audience that didn’t cheer even for his most reliable applause lines, Sanders stuck to the message that has been core to his campaign. There were missteps, but for rivals desperate to change the trajectory of the race, the knockout blow never came.

Biden, Steyer fight for black voters

Democratic presidential candidates former Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Tom Steyer (R) debate as Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) reacts during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidates former Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Tom Steyer (R) debate as Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) reacts during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

In Saturday’s primary in South Carolina, the most important constituency is African-American voters, who make up more than half the electorate and who Biden has called his “firewall” of support.
That reality turned the debate into a brawl between Biden and Steyer, who has made significant inroads with black voters after focusing his campaign on South Carolina more than any other state.
Biden lambasted Steyer for investing in private prisons.
“They hogtied young men in prison here in this state. They in fact made sure that in Georgia they did not have health care for the people that were being held,” Biden said.
“You wrote the crime bill,” Steyer shot back, referencing the 1994 legislation signed into law by former President Bill Clinton and noting that it had imposed stiff mandatory minimum sentences that had left hundreds of thousands of black and brown people in jail.
Steyer then talked about all the efforts he has made to end the private prison system in California and address systemic racism in the criminal justice system.
“Tommy come lately,” Biden quipped.

Warren offers herself as the safer version of Sanders

Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) raise their hands during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) raise their hands during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Warren has been quietly chipping away at Sanders for weeks. On Tuesday night, she showed her hand early on.
After talking up the Democratic Party’s progressive wing and its goals, sprinkling in some praise for Sanders, she began to explain why she was the better bet to turn those ideas into reality.
She was most pointed on their shared support for Medicare for All, the bill Sanders famously wrote and Warren, after backing it, first put out a plan to finance, then said she would implement in two separate stages.
“Bernie and I both want to see universal health care, but Bernie’s plan doesn’t explain how to get there. Doesn’t show how we’re going to get enough allies into it and doesn’t show enough about how we’re going to pay for it,” Warren said.
After she “dug in” and offered the pay-for plan, Warren added, “Bernie’s team trashed me for it.”
Her message was clear: If you like Sanders’ politics and want his platform to become a reality, I’m the one to make it happen — and unify the party in the process.

Sanders still has a Cuba problem

Other candidates might have failed to nail him down on it. But Sanders showed he hadn’t come up with a stronger explanation for his praise of Fidel Castro’s Cuban regime’s literacy efforts — something that could become a long-term political headache for the Vermont senator’s campaign.
On Tuesday night, Sanders pointed out that former President Barack Obama had made comments similar to his about Cuba.
“Occasionally, it might be a good idea to be honest about American foreign policy, and that includes the fact that America has overthrown governments all over the world — in Chile, in Guatemala, in Iran, and when dictatorships, whether it is the Chinese or the Cubans, do something good, you acknowledge that, but you don’t have to trade love letters with them,” Sanders said.
That moved him past the moment Tuesday night. But it likely won’t calm the nerves of Democrats — especially in Florida — who are worried about how the GOP will weaponize Sanders’ words.

Bloomberg shows preparation matters

Democratic presidential candidate former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg speaks during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidate former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg speaks during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Bloomberg’s performance last week in Las Vegas was disastrous — so the mayor canceled all but one event in between the two debates to prepare for his second appearance on stage.
And, while his performance Tuesday was far from perfect, the extra preparation showed.
Bloomberg faced harsh attacks from Warren over lewd comments he made to former employees and comments he made about redlining, racist policies that blocked African Americans and Latinos from buying homes for decades.
But Bloomberg approached the debate differently and was far more aggressive in pushing back and attempting to move on.
He said Warren was “misinformed” on redlining and presented a litany of housing policies he pushed as mayor. And when Warren attacked him for reportedly telling a female employee who was pregnant to “kill it,” Bloomberg simply said, “I never said that.”
Bloomberg got to tout his own policies, and said his approach to trans-fats and sugary beverages in New York wouldn’t translate nationally. He said Chinese president Xi Jinping isn’t a dictator — a remark that drew an immediate rebuke from Sanders.
But Bloomberg was on the verge of making a major gaffe, nearly saying he “bought” House races in 2018 before catching himself and instead saying, “I got them.”

Buttigieg makes everything about Sanders

Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks as former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg (L) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (R) looks on during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks as former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg (L) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (R) looks on during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Buttigieg made clear on Tuesday that the only way he wins the Democratic nomination is by taking Sanders down.
Nearly every moment Buttigieg was able to comment on — from foreign policy, to health care to his campaign fundraising — was turned into an attack on the frontrunner. And Buttigieg was far more aggressive than any past debate, regularly jumping in and talking over Sanders when he could.
“Look, if you think the last four years has been chaotic, divisive, toxic, exhausting,” Buttigieg said, “imagine spending the better part of 2020 with Bernie Sanders vs. Donald Trump.”
Buttigieg also took Sanders on for criticizing his fundraising, questioned the senator’s ability to “deliver a revolution” and echoed the fears some Democrats have about the independent by stoking speculation about what his nomination would mean to down ballot races for the House and Senate.
“They are running away from your platform as fast as they possibly can,” Buttigieg said of House members who won for the first time in 2018.
While Buttigieg delivered a steady performance, his strategy also reflects the fact that, without a significant change in the race, the former mayor’s window to the nomination could be closing.

Klobuchar changes her tact

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) speaks as former Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Tom Steyer (R) look on during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) speaks as former Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Tom Steyer (R) look on during the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

The Klobuchar that delivered a combative, fiery performance at the debate last week in Las Vegas was almost unrecognizable compared to the candidate who criticized the field for discord on Tuesday night.
Klobuchar barely leveled any attacks on Tuesday night; instead, she consistently answered some of the more substantive questions and attempting to sound like the voice of reason on an otherwise chaotic stage.
It’s a departure for the senator, who was unafraid to mix is up last week, especially with Buttigieg, a candidate she has long had a deep-seated animosity towards.
Klobuchar still got a few shots in, like when she hit Sanders over Medicare for All and subtly knocked Buttigieg for mentioning his campaign website on stage. But her debate was more defined by answers on both domestic and foreign policy and the moments where she took issue with the tone and tenor of the contest.
“If we spend the next four months tearing our party apart,” Klobuchar said, “we’re going to watch Donald Trump spend the next four years tearing our country apart.”

Biden his time

Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), and Tom Steyer participate in the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), and Tom Steyer participate in the Democratic presidential primary debate at the Charleston Gaillard Center on February 25, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Biden was in the middle of an answer when he abruptly stopped — and then wondered why he had.
“Why am I stopping? No one else stops,” he said, chalking it up to his “Catholic school training.”
CBS moderator Gayle King called him a “gentleman” for following the rules.
“Gentlemen don’t get very well treated up here,” he groused.
Biden was right: Tuesday night’s moderation contributed to the most chaotic atmosphere of any of the 10 Democratic debates to date. CBS anchors at times lost control and let the candidates brawl — and then selectively attempted to regain it by repeatedly interrupting candidates mid-answer.
The questions often seemed to ignore — or be months behind — the real points of tension in the Democratic presidential race. And the candidates often ignored the questions, as Biden did when he was asked to name the biggest misconception about him and offer his personal motto, and he answered in part by promising to appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court.
The Singapore start up is getting an $850 million cash boost from investors that it plans to pump into digital payments and financial services. The injection comes as Grab is battling for market share against Indonesia’s GoJek.
Japan’s largest bank, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MBFJF), put up more than $700 million, with the rest coming from TIS, a Japanese IT solutions company.
Grab president Ming Maa said in a statement that the company will work with Mitsubishi and TIS to co-develop financial products.
“Ensuring greater access to affordable and accessible financial services and products is key to growing financial inclusion in Southeast Asia,” Maa said.
Why it's so hard to give up ridesharing

Since driving Uber (UBER) out of Southeast Asia in 2018, Grab has stepped up the competition with regional rivals like GoJek, which is headquartered in Jakarta. GoJek launched on Grab’s home turf of Singapore in 2018.
Both companies have expanded beyond ride-hailing, and are trying to create irreplaceable “super apps” that offer customers everything from food delivery to financial services.
Last year, Grab rolled out financial services like consumer insurance and loans to its users.
Grab dominates the ride-hailing industry in the eight countries in the region where it operates. But GoJek dominates in its home country of Indonesia.
Grab was last valued at more than $14 billion and GoJek is worth about $10 billion, according to CB Insights.

Raul Reyes: Debate devolves into a free-for-all

Raul A. Reyes

Tuesday night’s debate was somewhere between an episode of “The Jerry Springer Show” and a “Real Housewives” reunion: messy, chaotic and embarrassing for nearly everyone involved. It was inevitable that, as the stakes have grown higher in the battle for the Democratic presidential nomination, there would be a greater sense of urgency among the candidates to stand out. But that did not mean the event had to devolve into a free-for-all.
It is hard to come up with positive take on this debate, as we’ve heard most of these candidates’ message before. Although former Mayor Michael Bloomberg marginally improved on his disastrous debate debut last week, that’s an awfully low bar to clear. Ditto for former Vice President Joe Biden. He was more energetic and passionate than usual, but that did not necessarily make him more effective on stage.
Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar was absolutely right when she declared that “If we spend the next four months tearing the party apart, we will watch Donald Trump spend the next four years tearing the country apart.” There was way too much infighting at this debate, which is troubling given that all of these candidates will have to coalesce around the eventual nominee. Memo to the candidates (or as Bloomberg referred to them, his “fellow contestants”): Your rivals are not the enemy. Trump is the enemy.
There were plenty of low points in this dismal evening. The moderators did a poor job reining in the candidates, allowing them to jump in, seemingly at random, and then cutting them off, just as randomly. The candidates outdid themselves in pandering to African American voters. Bloomberg’s attempts at jokes, from kidding about how well he had done at the last debate to name-checking “The Naked Cowboy,” were pathetic. The Bloomberg commercial that ran during the debate only served to further the notion that he is trying to buy the nomination.
And once again, the lack of any significant discussion of immigration in a Democratic debate was notable. California and Texas, the two states with the country’s largest Latino populations, vote on Super Tuesday — and so overlooking this critical topic was inexcusable.
Raul A. Reyes is an attorney and a member of the USA Today board of contributors. Follow him on Twitter @RaulAReyes.

Sarah Isgur: Sanders is gonna need Elizabeth Warren’s help

Sarah Isgur

Sarah Isgur

Elizabeth Warren proved once again that she was the most effective candidate at scoring points against her opponents on the stage. Her repeated attacks on Michael Bloomberg’s record were accessible, articulate, and most importantly, got the job done. But, of course, Bloomberg isn’t the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination. Bernie Sanders is.
On the other hand, because of the Democrat’s proportional allocation of delegates in this primary process, Bloomberg’s self-funded candidacy with its nearly limitless ad budget does have the possibility of gaining enough traction to prevent Sanders from getting the 1,991 delegates he needs to clinch the nomination.
Given her experience before joining the Senate, Warren easily could have run her presidential campaign as the anti-corruption, non-ideological author of The Two Income Trap focused on a middle-class economic message. Instead, she spent the majority of 2019 drafting behind Sanders, making the case that she was the most viable alternative for progressive voters if and when Sanders’ campaign collapsed. It didn’t.
At 70 years old, it is hard to imagine she is thinking about another presidential run in four years, but she can use her time on the stage to showcase her immense political talent to Sanders’ supporters. And for his part, Sanders has shown that he can energize his base and sell his economic message, but as the likely nominee, he will need a vice president who can defend his policies and prosecute the case against Donald Trump. Tonight, Elizabeth made the case against Bloomberg– and for a place on the Sanders’ ticket.
Sarah Isgur is a CNN political analyst. She has worked on three Republican presidential campaigns and is an adjunct professor at George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School.

Errol Louis: Bloomberg makes a compelling case for a moderate

Errol Louis

Errol Louis

Mayor Michael Bloomberg fought his way back into contention in the Democratic primary for president by obeying a simple rule: never let an attack go unanswered. Unlike last week’s disastrous debate, the ex-mayor of New York came out swinging.
“Russia is helping you get elected,” he said to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders when the question of foreign election interference came up.
“We cannot continue to relitigate this every time,” he told Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren when she brought up charges of workplace discrimination by ex-employees of Bloomberg’s business.
And, for good measure, he threw in a quick breakdown of the size of the multi-trillion-dollar federal budget, noting that the US government has $20 trillion in debt, concluding that, “We just cannot afford some of the stuff people talk about.”
The single most important statement Bloomberg made was an electability argument, aimed at nervous moderate Democrats.
“If you keep on going, we will elect Bernie — Bernie will lose to Donald Trump. And the House and the Senate and some of the statehouses will all go red,” Bloomberg said. “And then between gerrymandering and appointing judges, for the next 20 or 30 years, we’re going to live with this catastrophe.”
It’s an important argument, and one that can’t easily be conveyed in commercials. But a campaign ad is exactly where a bluntly political case can and should be made.
Sanders retorted by citing a string of polls showing him beating President Donald Trump in key midwestern states. Bloomberg dismissed the numbers.
Can anybody imagine moderate Republicans voting for [Sanders]? You have to do it, or you can’t win.”
That is Bloomberg’s central argument: that a billionaire ex-Republican has the kind of crossover appeal needed to win independent and moderate Republican voters. Will Democratic voters buy it? We’ll find out a week from now when the Super Tuesday states allocate nearly a quarter of the delegates needed to select a Democratic nominee.
Errol Louis is the host of “Inside City Hall,” a nightly political show on NY1, a New York all-news channel.

Jen Psaki: Despite his Castro comments, Sanders may be unstoppable

Jen Psaki

Jen Psaki

It took 10 primary debates, but tonight Bernie Sanders was finally treated like the Democratic frontrunner. And all of the other candidates’ opposition research and prepared attacks on Sanders’ record on gun safety, his vague answers on how he will pay for his plans and questions about whether his proposals would hurt candidates up and down came spilling out in the first half.
But the toughest exchange was around his defense of statements he’d made praising some aspects of Fidel Castro’s Cuba, such as advances in literacy and health care (he also denounced the leader’s dictatorship). Remarkably, he seemed surprised, he doubled down and he got angry. After a confusing, loud and at times out of control debate, it may not be a moment that slows Bernie Sanders’ momentum, but it was a clear indication that his opponents know that he is on the verge of being unstoppable.
Jen Psaki, a CNN political commentator, was the White House communications director and State Department spokeswoman during the Obama administration. She is vice president of communications and strategy at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Follow her at @jrpsaki.

Scott Jennings: Debate was Buttigieg’s weakest performance

Scott Jennings

Scott Jennings

It’s hard to pick a winner tonight, but if I had to, I would say probably former Vice President Joe Biden. He was sharp early on and likely did enough to stave off Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in Saturday’s South Carolina primary. Biden certainly faded in the home stretch, but he seemed to grasp it was now or never for his campaign. His answers on Cuba and Russia election meddling were just laughable, though.
But the question is: did anyone do a thing to stop Sanders’ probable path to winning at least a plurality of delegates? It’s doubtful. Sanders had some weak moments — even seeming bored at times — but he largely stuck to the messages that have built his front-runner status, from Medicare for All to promises of free public college.
While his opponents attacked him early on, they largely forgot about hammering Sanders after the first few minutes. And he just plowed forward because he knows his people aren’t moved by the costs of his radical plans or attacks on his past voting records.
This debate was former Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s weakest debate, matching what will likely be a weak showing for in the state primary. Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, too, seemed to be out of gas, and her material was really stale (Uncle Dick’s deer stand needs to be retired pronto). Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren landed a couple of punches and had a decent moment or two, but was it a momentum building night? No.
Meanwhile, Tom Steyer seems useless in all these debates, though he’s polling better in South Carolina than in other states. Mike Bloomberg vastly improved, but it would have been harder to get any worse compared to his maiden voyage last week. His jokes were pretty bad, but he had some sharp moments on foreign policy and charter schools that would appeal to moderate voters.
Overall, this debate was a mess. There was more crosstalk than usual, the moderators were weak, and the production was not well-executed. When Andrew Yang dropped out, every ounce of likability was drained from the Democratic debate stage.
Scott Jennings, a CNN contributor, is a former special assistant to President George W. Bush and a former campaign adviser to Sen. Mitch McConnell. He is a partner at RunSwitch Public Relations in Louisville, Kentucky. Follow him on Twitter @ScottJenningsKY.

Frida Ghitis: Excruciating night for undecided voters

Frida Ghitis

Frida Ghitis

The 10th debate of the Democratic primary season was not just a wild and chaotic affair, it was a confusing and un-useful exercise for undecided Democrats–desperate to make their choice as time runs out to select a nominee. Bernie Sanders leads in the polls, but most Democrats prefer someone else. The undecided are torn among the choices, dividing their preference and leaving Sanders in the lead.
The excruciating debate did not help.
Elizabeth Warren played Sanders wing woman, repeatedly attacking former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and thus deflecting attention away from Sanders, who had what is probably his worst debate yet. Warren appears to be aiming to be Sanders’ running mate
Bloomberg was not the disaster of his first debate, but he came across as aloof and cold. His attempts at humor fell harmlessly flat. But he scored points when he asked, “Can anyone imagine moderate Republicans voting for him?” He’s right. Sanders’ defense of the achievements of socialist dictatorships will fill President Donald Trump’s campaign ads.
Joe Biden had his best night yet, and his many fans in South Carolina are no doubt pleased with his performance. He passionately highlighted the accomplishments of his long career, from the Violence Against Women Act to gun control and foreign policy.
Pete Buttigieg is pretty close to perfect on just about every topic. Smart, thoughtful, controlled. He framed the risk precisely when he said we can’t afford a choice between Trump’s nostalgia for the 1950s and Sanders’ nostalgia for the socialism of the 1960s.
Buttigieg will make a great candidate one day, in the future. He’s had a great debut on the national stage. Now it’s time for those who claim Democrats need to unite to make the ultimate sacrifice. Why is Tom Steyer still running? And Biden, Bloomberg, Amy Klobuchar and Buttigieg–they need to decide if they want Sanders to be the nominee. If they all stay in the race, Sanders will win the primary race.
The night left the Democrats undecided and divided. That made it a great night for Trump.
Frida Ghitis, a former CNN producer and correspondent, is a world affairs columnist. She is a frequent opinion contributor to CNN, a contributing columnist to the Washington Post and a columnist for World Politics Review. Follow her on Twitter @fridaghitis.

Chris King: Democrats did little to reach voters of faith

Chris King

Chris King

As a progressive and an entrepreneur, a lifelong Democrat and evangelical Christian, and as the 2018 Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Florida that fell 30,000 votes short of flipping Florida blue, I have received a world class education in how hard it is to beat Donald Trump.
Here is what I learned:
If Trump is even remotely able to brand you a socialist, you lose. Game over. A countless number of Americans have seen the ravages of socialism around the world and they demand their leaders appreciate that. Senator Bernie Sanders starts with a deep disadvantage here. His inability tonight to explain how many “trillions” of dollars it will take to enact his policies and his refusal to back down from praising Fidel Castro will only exacerbate a concern that he fundamentally misunderstands and trivializes the issue.
The unaddressed issue: right now, Trump owns “white” faith voters. He has exploited them but barely understands them. Unfortunately, tonight’s debate didn’t do enough to reach out to them. You don’t win Florida, North Carolina or the industrial Midwest if you can’t win over a share of these voters. Voters want to hear an alternative vision of faith in pursuit of the common good, one that is kind, compassionate and inclusive.
Perhaps the greatest contribution any Democrat can make by winning in November will be ridding the nation and the world of the divisive, ugly, and incompetent leadership of Donald Trump. That would be a triumph on its own, and if the candidates agreed on one thing tonight, it’s that they are unified in that mission.
Chris King was the 2018 Democratic nominee for lieutenant governor of Florida. He is the CEO of Elevation Financial Group in Orlando. Follow him on Twitter @ChrisKingFL.
Exceptional Estate Sales in Sudbury, Massachusetts, is advertising an estate sale at Big Papi’s house on February 29. The business is (obviously) expecting a large turnout.
CNN has reached out to Ortiz’s spokesman for more information, but the photos give a pretty good idea of what’s for sale.

For the sports fanatic, there are autographed Big Papi bobbleheads (in original boxes!), an autographed proof of a photo of Ted Williams, and a Red Sox World Series Champions table commemorating the team’s wins in 2004, 2007 and 2013. Need a charcoal grill to complete your tailgate setup? Or maybe a mock scoreboard for the living room? All that, and more, is available.
Not a big sports fan? No problem.
Maybe you need a new coat rack. Or a quality sectional. Or even a pedestal fan. The sale has something for everyone.
What about an asparagus rug? Or do you fancy a frog strumming a guitar? Look no further.

“That’s the beauty of an estate sale. Yes, we sell beautiful things, collectibles, but we also sell everything else,” said Stephanie Hull, one of the estate sale company’s owners.
Why head to the Gucci store when you can go to the Big Papi estate sale? Heels galore. And even a shoe rack to put them on!

Starting a soccer team? Boom — practice net.
For folks with balance, a Big Papi hoverboard.
Don’t forget these man cave furnishings!
Hull said while Exceptional Estate Sales has handled high-profile sales before, Big Papi is their biggest celebrity client so far.
“We hope people will come and take home a piece for themselves,” Hull said.
This is far from a comprehensive list. Take a look at all of the items here, or get in the (probably long) line Saturday morning.
Cash or credit only. No checks (except this one for sale):

“I have opposed authoritarianism all over the world,” Sanders said at the Democratic primary debate in South Carolina.
The senator then turned to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who moments earlier said Chinese President Xi Jinping has an “enormous amount of power” but serves at the behest of the Politburo. The Politburo of the Communist Party of China is an elite council of leaders in the party and one step above is the Politburo Standing Committee, a smaller and even more powerful body.
“I was really amazed at what Mayor Bloomberg just said a moment ago,” Sanders said. “He said that the Chinese government is responsive to the Politburo, but who the hell is the Politburo responsive to? Who elects the Politburo? You got a real dictatorship there.”
Sanders faced a wave of bipartisan criticism after he praised a literacy program the Cuban government launched in its first years and asserted to CBS’ “60 Minutes” that “it’s unfair to simply say everything is bad” with the way Castro ruled the country.
Over parts of five decades, Sanders more than any other national political figure has engaged and, at times, defended the Cuban government, Daniel Ortega’s Nicaragua and other controversial leaders across Latin America and Russia. These views mark a stark break from the foreign policy consensus that dominated American political circles since the end of World War II.
Sanders said at the debate that his comments on Cuba echoed what former President Barack Obama said about education and health care in the country. Obama struck a deal to reopen diplomatic relations and re-establish some trade with Cuba after a more than a half century of estrangement, and became the first sitting president to visit Cuba since 1959.
“What Barack Obama said is they made great progress on education and health care. That was Barack Obama,” Sanders said.
He continued, “Occasionally, it might be a good idea to be honest about American foreign policy, and that includes the fact that America has overthrown governments all over the world in Chile, in Guatemala, in Iran, and when dictatorships, whether the Chinese or the Cubans, do something good, you acknowledge that, but you don’t have to trade love letters with them.”
Former Vice President Joe Biden jumped in and said Obama “did not in any way suggest that there was anything positive about the Cuban government.”
“(Obama) acknowledged that they did increase life expectancy, but he went on and condemned the dictatorship, he went on and condemned the people who, in fact, had run that committee,” he said.
Biden said, “The fact of the matter is (Obama), in fact, does not, did not, has never embraced an authoritarian regime and does not now.”
Sanders started saying, “Authoritarianism of any stripe is bad –“
“Period,” Biden interjected.
“– but that is different than saying governments occasionally do things that are good,” Sanders said.
“I have opposed authoritarianism all over the world,” Sanders said at the Democratic primary debate in South Carolina.
The senator then turned to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who moments earlier said Chinese President Xi Jinping has an “enormous amount of power” but serves at the behest of the Politburo. The Politburo of the Communist Party of China is an elite council of leaders in the party and one step above is the Politburo Standing Committee, a smaller and even more powerful body.
“I was really amazed at what Mayor Bloomberg just said a moment ago,” Sanders said. “He said that the Chinese government is responsive to the Politburo, but who the hell is the Politburo responsive to? Who elects the Politburo? You got a real dictatorship there.”
Sanders faced a wave of bipartisan criticism after he praised a literacy program the Cuban government launched in its first years and asserted to CBS’ “60 Minutes” that “it’s unfair to simply say everything is bad” with the way Castro ruled the country.
Over parts of five decades, Sanders more than any other national political figure has engaged and, at times, defended the Cuban government, Daniel Ortega’s Nicaragua and other controversial leaders across Latin America and Russia. These views mark a stark break from the foreign policy consensus that dominated American political circles since the end of World War II.
Sanders said at the debate that his comments on Cuba echoed what former President Barack Obama said about education and health care in the country. Obama struck a deal to reopen diplomatic relations and re-establish some trade with Cuba after a more than a half century of estrangement, and became the first sitting president to visit Cuba since 1959.
“What Barack Obama said is they made great progress on education and health care. That was Barack Obama,” Sanders said.
He continued, “Occasionally, it might be a good idea to be honest about American foreign policy, and that includes the fact that America has overthrown governments all over the world in Chile, in Guatemala, in Iran, and when dictatorships, whether the Chinese or the Cubans, do something good, you acknowledge that, but you don’t have to trade love letters with them.”
Former Vice President Joe Biden jumped in and said Obama “did not in any way suggest that there was anything positive about the Cuban government.”
“(Obama) acknowledged that they did increase life expectancy, but he went on and condemned the dictatorship, he went on and condemned the people who, in fact, had run that committee,” he said.
Biden said, “The fact of the matter is (Obama), in fact, does not, did not, has never embraced an authoritarian regime and does not now.”
Sanders started saying, “Authoritarianism of any stripe is bad –“
“Period,” Biden interjected.
“– but that is different than saying governments occasionally do things that are good,” Sanders said.