Here’s where Kavanaugh, who was a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit for 12 years, stands on some hot-button issues:

Roe v. Wade and abortion rights

During his first round of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Kavanaugh said he views Roe v. Wade, the landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide, as “important precedent of the Supreme Court” that has been “reaffirmed many times.” Yet he declined to say he would not vote to reverse Roe, saying that such a vow — on any case — would violate judicial norms.
He also defended a dissenting opinion he wrote last year when the full DC Circuit allowed a 17-year-old to end her pregnancy over objections from the Trump administration.
For Kavanaugh, a 'formative' job; but for senators, few records are available

In his dissent, Kavanaugh wrote the Supreme Court has held that “the government has permissible interests in favoring fetal life, protecting the best interests of a minor, and refraining from facilitating abortion.” He wrote that the high court has “held that the government may further those interests so long as it does not impose an undue burden on a woman seeking an abortion.” He said the majority opinion was “based on a constitutional principle as novel as it is wrong: a new right for unlawful immigrant minors in US government detention to obtain immediate abortion on demand.”
Overall, his testimony reinforced his past writings suggesting he would permit the government to more strictly regulate abortion, for example, with additional requirements that could delay the procedure or stiffer rules for physicians who would perform it.
Trump has long vowed to appoint justices who would reverse Roe and allow the states to determine whether abortion should be legal. Kennedy had been a swing vote in favor of abortion rights.

Executive branch authority

During his confirmation hearings, Kavanaugh declined to elaborate on his views on executive power or protections for a president who might face an investigation and subpoena.
When Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California asked Kavanaugh if a sitting president could be compelled to respond to a subpoena, he declined to offer his views. “I can’t give you an answer on that hypothetical question,” he said.
In a 2009 Minnesota Law Review article, Kavanaugh had written that “Congress might consider a law exempting a President — while in office — from criminal prosecution and investigation, including from questioning by criminal prosecutors or defense counsel.” In the same article, however, he noted, “If the President does something dastardly, the impeachment process is available.”
John Dean, Theodore Olson among witnesses for upcoming Kavanaugh hearings

John Dean, Theodore Olson among witnesses for upcoming Kavanaugh hearings

Agency power and government regulation

Kavanaugh has demonstrated a tendency toward suspicion of, rather than deference to, regulatory agency interpretations of federal laws.
“It’s all about the statute you write,” he emphasized to Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, noting he would not impose new requirements — on businesses, for example — that Congress had not made explicit. That view, as Klobuchar noted, can limit regulatory safeguards on the job, environmental rules and consumer protection.
Kavanaugh’s views on government regulation may be best exemplified by his dissent in the case of a killer whale that attacked a SeaWorld trainer.
What the case of a killer whale tells us about Brett Kavanaugh

What the case of a killer whale tells us about Brett Kavanaugh

As Kavanaugh criticized a Labor Department move to sanction SeaWorld following the drowning of a trainer by the orca Tilikum, he declared that the agency had “stormed headlong into a new regulatory arena” and warned that regulators would try to impose new safety requirements on sports, the circus and more.
Overall, his view is that agencies should exercise authority as clearly spelled out in federal statutes and that judges should not, as occurred in the SeaWorld case, defer to agency interpretations that go beyond what’s explicit in a law.
In opinions and speeches, Kavanaugh has questioned a ruling in a 1984 Supreme Court case, Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council, that said judges should defer to agency interpretations of ambiguous laws. That, he said in a 2017 speech, “encourages agency aggressiveness on a large scale.”

Religious liberty

Kavanaugh said generally during his hearings that “it’s important to recognize that the First Amendment to the Constitution, as well as many statutes, of course, protect religious liberty in the United States … and as I’ve said in some of my opinions, we are all equally American no matter what religion we are or no religion at all — and that means religious speakers and religious people have a right to their place in the public square.”
On the DC Circuit, Kavanaugh dissented in the 2015 case of Priests for Life v. Department of Health and Human Services, focused on a religious exemption to the Affordable Care Act. He dissented when the DC Circuit declined a full court review of a religious group’s objection to the process for employers seeking to opt out of the mandate to provide insurance coverage for contraceptives.
Priests for Life had challenged the process for certifying eligibility for exemptions, contending the paperwork involved burdened religious rights. Kavanaugh agreed, saying, “To plaintiffs, the act of submitting this form would, in their religious judgment, impermissibly facilitate delivery of contraceptive and abortifacient coverage.”
He said that rather than a form, the group could — as the Supreme Court had allowed in separate cases — be permitted to simply notify the secretary of health and human services in writing that it objects to providing coverage for contraceptives.

Second Amendment

In 2011, Kavanaugh dissented from a majority opinion of the DC Circuit that upheld a ban that applied to semiautomatic rifles in the District of Columbia.
In his dissent, he wrote that the Supreme Court had previously “held that handguns — the vast majority of which today are semiautomatic — are constitutionally protected because they have not traditionally been banned and are in common use by law-abiding citizens.”
Citing a previous high court ruling, Kavanaugh went on to say, “It follows from Heller‘s protection of semiautomatic handguns that semiautomatic rifles are also constitutionally protected and that DC’s ban on them is unconstitutional.”
Feinstein pressed Kavanaugh on his dissent during his confirmation hearings, asking, “What did you base your conclusion on that assault weapons are in common use?”
“I had to follow precedent,” Kavanaugh said, adding that “semiautomatic rifles are widely possessed in the United States … so that seemed to fit common use in not being a dangerous and unusual weapon. That was the basis of my dissent.”

Privacy and national security

In 2015, Kavanaugh wrote an opinion defending the US government’s controversial metadata collection program, in part citing national security considerations. He wrote that the program “is entirely consistent with the Fourth Amendment,” which protects against unreasonable search and seizure.
He wrote that the program “does not capture the content of communications, but rather the time and duration of calls and the numbers called,” and said it “serves a critically important special need — preventing terrorist attacks on the United States.” Kavanaugh argued “that critical national security need outweighs the impact on privacy occasioned by this program.”

Net neutrality

In a 2017 dissent, Kavanaugh said he believed that Obama-era net neutrality regulations were “unlawful” and wrote that the policy violated the First Amendment.
At issue were rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission in 2015 to more strictly regulate the Internet. The rules, based on the principle of “net neutrality,” were intended to provide equal opportunity for Internet speeds and access to websites. In a May 2017 order, a majority of the DC Circuit declined to review an earlier decision siding with the FCC. Under the Trump administration, the FCC has since moved to dismantle the regulation.
Kavanaugh pick was scripted end to Trump's reality show

Kavanaugh pick was scripted end to Trump's reality show

Kavanaugh wrote in his 2017 dissenting opinion that the regulation was consequential and “transforms the Internet.” But he said the rule “impermissibly infringes on the Internet service providers’ editorial discretion,” and he suggested the FCC had overreached in issuing the regulation. “Congress did not clearly authorize the FCC to issue the net neutrality rule,” he wrote.
“I thought that Susan was incredible yesterday,” Trump told reporters Saturday as he left the White House to fly to Kansas for a political rally.
“She gave an impassioned, beautiful speech yesterday. And that was from the heart, that was from the heart,” Trump added.
Collins, a key swing vote in the Senate, delivered a speech Friday afternoon affirming that she would vote to confirm Kavanaugh, who faced allegations of sexual assault. Kavanaugh has vehemently denied the allegations.
Before departing, Trump said that he was “really looking forward to the vote,” and lauded Kavanaugh as an “extraordinary person” and “great talent.”
“I think he’s going to be a great, great Supreme Court Justice for many years,” he said.
Trump also mentioned that he spoke to Collins, but did not provide additional details. “You could see how hard she worked. … She didn’t stop. And I know it for a fact because I spoke with her. She didn’t stop,” Trump said.
The Senate ultimately voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh Saturday afternoon following a contentious confirmation battle.
“I thought that Susan was incredible yesterday,” Trump told reporters Saturday as he left the White House to fly to Kansas for a political rally.
“She gave an impassioned, beautiful speech yesterday. And that was from the heart, that was from the heart,” Trump added.
Collins, a key swing vote in the Senate, delivered a speech Friday afternoon affirming that she would vote to confirm Kavanaugh, who faced allegations of sexual assault. Kavanaugh has vehemently denied the allegations.
Before departing, Trump said that he was “really looking forward to the vote,” and lauded Kavanaugh as an “extraordinary person” and “great talent.”
“I think he’s going to be a great, great Supreme Court Justice for many years,” he said.
Trump also mentioned that he spoke to Collins, but did not provide additional details. “You could see how hard she worked. … She didn’t stop. And I know it for a fact because I spoke with her. She didn’t stop,” Trump said.
The Senate ultimately voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh Saturday afternoon following a contentious confirmation battle.

Roxanne Jones: Kavanaugh and the savagery of America — this is us

Roxanne Jones

There comes a time when life forces us to reveal the content of our character, our souls. And America’s time is now. Brett Kavanaugh is the face and the voice of America, whether we like it, or not.
Don’t deny it.
Kavanaugh’s angry and defiant attitude of entitlement is no different from the marauding men who invaded America centuries ago with a goal to create a world in their image. History tells us that anyone who stood in the way of their desires was destroyed. Makes no difference if it’s women like Christine Blasey Ford or Anita Hill, who both echo the painful experiences of millions of unseen women who have been sexually assaulted and harassed. Because to these men, women have been deemed weak creatures, to be pampered, possessed — or denigrated and destroyed — at will.
For me, Kavanaugh’s confirmation was a forgone conclusion — despite Ford’s testimony — under this current “take-no-prisoners” culture. When President Donald Trump was elected, we should have known it was game-over for compassionate politics. We gave him the power to build a Supreme Court of his liking, knowing that there would be multiple vacancies to fill during his term. And it’s unrealistic to think that any amount of division or screaming in the streets would force Trump to willingly give up his power.
This is his chance to create a world in his image.
This what untamed power looks like. Each of us is at fault when communities allow systemic hate to fester or when democracy begins to feel like dictatorship. And surely, we have failed when our sons grow up to treat women as chattel.
Let’s stop blaming politicians for our problems. For too long, we’ve held them unaccountable and been afraid or unwilling to participate in our own democracy. Only 56% of the eligible U.S. voting population bothered to cast a vote in 2016 presidential election, one of the lowest voter turnouts in the world for any highly developed democracy, according the Pew Research Center. That voting percentage drops drastically for midterm and local state elections.
We are a nation that professes to love democracy but we are unwilling to do the work it requires of us.
It’s no shock that Kavanaugh is now a Supreme Court Justice. The shock, and the shame, is that we’ve allowed this to happen.
Roxanne Jones, a founding editor of ESPN Magazine and former vice president at ESPN, has worked as a producer, reporter and editor at the New York Daily News and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Jones is co-author of “Say it Loud: An Illustrated History of the Black Athlete.” She talks politics, sports and culture weekly on Philadelphia’s Praise 107.9 FM.

Eleanor McManus: We haven’t learned a thing

Eleanor McManus

Eleanor McManus

A year has passed since the publication of allegations of sexual assault and misconduct sparked a global reckoning. It is therefore incredibly ironic that one year after the fall of powerful men, the US Senate will vote to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court of the United States.
One year later, what have we learned? Nothing.
Many women have found their voices and bravely come forward with their stories. We are recognizing the systematic pattern of harassment and bringing into the light the behavior of predatory men previously relegated to whisper networks within the workplace, college campuses, and elsewhere. #MeToo has exposed patriarchal power structures that protected abusers and mired survivors in shame and embarrassment.
But one year later, despite all this, many are still doubting the victims. We are about to confirm a Supreme Court Justice who allegedly assaulted an underage woman in high school (an allegation he vigorously denies). One year later, the President of the United States has publicly mocked and bullied that woman.
One year later the clear message to our daughters and our sons is that speaking out has consequences. The powerful and entitled often continue in their positions of power, or, in one case, become a Supreme Court Justice.
To all the women who are, or will speak out, please know we are listening, we believe you. But judging by the latest example which played out over the last two weeks, clearly, lasting cultural change doesn’t happen overnight.
Eleanor McManus is co-founder of the strategic communications and crisis management firm Trident DMG. She is co-founder of Press Forward, an independent initiative whose mission is to change culture in newsrooms. She was formerly a senior producer for CNN. Follow her @eleanorsmcmanus.

Doug Heye: Republicans shouldn’t spike the football

Doug Heye

Doug Heye

The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court brings a sigh of relief for conservatives and, for many initially skeptical of a Donald Trump presidency, is all they need to justify their support of his candidacy. And while many of Justice Kavanaugh’s decisions — and those of scores of lower court judges — will likely be ones I wholeheartedly support, I would caution my Republican brethren against spiking the football.
Our confirmation process, as Senator Susan Collins pointed out in her Friday remarks, has hit rock bottom. This process has not merely affected Judge Kavanaugh and Professor Ford. It affects all of us, leaving the country more divided than ever and dangerously close to unraveling. Indeed, as Sen. Collins noted, our Founders’ “vision of a more perfect union does not exist today, and if anything, we appear to me moving farther away from it.” In other words, in much of the country, we don’t like each other, we don’t talk to each other and we don’t trust each other. Indeed, often we no longer agree on what is truth.
In Collins’ remarks, she discussed many of the problems, but few of the solutions. Those are harder to identify, but it is clear that just as neither party shares the entire burden for how we got here, both parties will need to share responsibility for how we face this challenge.
Douglas Heye is a CNN political commentator and works in public relations. He is the former deputy chief of staff to former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

Jen Psaki: The #MeToo movement still has a long way to go

Jen Psaki

Jen Psaki

In the aftermath of accused sexual assaulter Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, we can safely say the #MeToo movement has not ended sexism in the United States. It would have been naive to expect it would. The movement woke people up to what far too many women have experienced, created a platform for women to share their stories and energized a younger population of activists. But the Kavanaugh confirmation is a reminder that there is a long way to go.
Electing more women to Congress next month is an important start, but Susan Collins showed, once again, that there are those who don’t understand the importance of change and the justice it would bring to countless women like Christine Blasey Ford, Kavanaugh’s accuser.
The biases against victims remain, the fact that most victims of sexual assault don’t come forward remains. Changing that will take more than electoral victories in November.
Jen Psaki, a CNN political commentator, was the White House communications director and State Department spokeswoman during the Obama administration. She is vice president of communications and strategy at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Follow her at @jrpsaki.

Scott Jennings: Nevertheless, Collins persisted

Scott Jennings

Scott Jennings

Don’t bet against Mitch McConnell.
When all is said and done, Brett Kavanaugh goes to the Supreme Court with a vote that spanned party lines and the extreme overreach during his confirmation process may have sunk two Democratic incumbents — Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Claire McCaskill of Missouri. Both are now in perilous positions as they fight for their political lives in red states overwhelmingly won by Donald Trump in 2016. McConnell couldn’t ask for a better outcome, and his own 2020 reelection looks sturdier by the day.
Notable in Sen. Susan Collins’ floor speech on Friday was her disdain for the left’s tactics in opposing Kavanaugh. She hammered the outside groups who wasted millions of dollars lying about Kavanaugh’s record. She was furious at Michael Avenatti’s outrageous entrance into the fray, with a client who claimed Kavanaugh was present for party where she was gang raped. And, though she defended her colleague Dianne Feinstein, Collins correctly excoriated her Democratic colleagues for opposing Kavanaugh within minutes of his announcement instead of doing their homework (the way she had clearly done).
The perfect ending to this saga was watching these liberal dudes in my Twitter feed mocking Collins for speaking too long. A female Republican senator dared to say a few words, and, because she didn’t acquiesce to the left’s demands, they wanted her to shut up.
Nevertheless, she persisted. Susan Collins is a hero for standing up to mob rule in America.
Scott Jennings, a CNN contributor, is a former special assistant to President George W. Bush and former campaign adviser to Sen. Mitch McConnell. He is a partner at RunSwitch Public Relations in Louisville, Kentucky. Follow him on Twitter @ScottJenningsKY.

Errol Louis: Belligerence is no barrier to a Supreme Court appointment

Errol Louis

Errol Louis

The hard lesson of Judge Kavanaugh’s elevation to Supreme Court is that being a belligerent, openly partisan nominee is no barrier to becoming a justice. Kavanaugh’s public tantrum the week before his confirmation included attacks on Democratic senators, a baseless conspiracy theory, and a warning that could be interpreted as a threat to retaliate against his Democratic opponents.
Kavanaugh called the hearings and accusations “a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election, fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record, revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left-wing opposition groups…And as we all know in the United States political system of the early 2000s, what goes around comes around.”
That unchecked rage, along with Kavanaugh’s snide questions about Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s drinking habits — a wisecrack for which he later apologized — mark a new low for the Supreme Court nomination process. It is strikingly reminiscent of the way President Trump has handled accusations of sexual misconduct: deny, attack, insult and threaten.
We might someday return to an atmosphere in which judicial nominees, no matter how angry they might feel about the political process, present themselves with calm, restraint and dignity. The Senate, unfortunately, has demonstrated that wild rage and personal insults are no bar to serving on the nation’s highest court.
Errol Louis is the host of “Inside City Hall,” a nightly political show on NY1, a New York all-news channel.

Jennifer Siebel Newsom: The GOP is America’s most elite fraternity

Jennifer Siebel Newsom

Jennifer Siebel Newsom

After Christine Blasey Ford’s wrenching testimony and before Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation, Donald Trump’s message was clear: “It’s a very scary time for young men in America.”
Teaching men that they are the true victims here would be laughable — if it wasn’t so dangerous. Because Kavanaugh’s testimony and the dismissal of Professor Ford’s, is proof that a “pernicious patriarchy“– as Cory Booker calls it — persists.
And at a time when women are speaking out, running for office, and winning in record numbers, the patriarchs are digging in their heels — only heightening the contrast between the two sides voters will consider when they go to the polls for the midterm elections in November.
The Republican Party has become perhaps the most elite fraternity in America. Join their ranks— if you are privileged and white — and the boys (and even some of the girls) will always have your back. They’ll defend to the end the cultural biases and institutions that keep the boys like them in power, and everyone else shut up and shut out.
The Republican message to our children is disturbingly clear: To our sons: This country will protect you regardless of your actions, at no cost to you. To our daughters: The pernicious patriarchy persists, at all cost to you.
This Kavanaugh episode screams out to the rest of us we must embrace a more inclusive alternative in November. We must change how we socialize our boys into men: that we should reward empathy, care and collaboration, instead of dominance, control, and aggression. To do anything else doesn’t just dehumanize our girls, it dehumanizes everyone.
Those of us who value inclusion and women’s voices have a clear message for the GOP: You will not return us to a time where women aren’t seen, valued, or heard. The Kavanaughs and Trumps of the world should be no one’s hero.
We will not forget Christine Blasey Ford. She has ignited a fire within us and we will thank her by continuing to speak truth to power. Doing so is our civic duty.
They may have confirmed their Justice, but they will not stop the flood of people rushing true justice forward.
We will vote in November and every election thereafter, until the stewards of patriarchy lose their grip on power once and for all.
Jennifer Siebel Newsom is the Founder and CEO of The Representation Project, and the filmmaker behind Miss Representation and The Mask You Live In, a documentary exploring America’s narrow definition of masculinity. She is the mother to four young children, including two boys, with her husband, California Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom.

Carrie Sheffield: People need to put their votes where their anger is

Carrie Sheffield

Carrie Sheffield

Some predict that Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation will inevitably tear the country further apart. Vicious-minded people are reverberating across social media and treading the streets in protest.
But this isn’t our destiny. Women (and men) who disagree should put their votes where their anger is, not further tear at our social fabric by perpetuating dehumanizing and vitriolic rhetoric.
In her Senate floor speech Friday announcing her support for Judge Kavanaugh, Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said “We have forgotten the common values that bind us together as Americans,” citing our Founders’ desires for what America should be.
“Their vision of a more perfect union does not exist today, and if anything, we appear to be moving farther away from it,” Collins said.
A post-Kavanaugh lesson that should unify left and right is this: women who have been assaulted (which hasn’t been proven here) should immediately report it. We need more robust mechanisms for gathering evidence and witnesses. When women do report they’ve been a victim, we must ensure their evidence is promptly processed and justice is swiftly served.
To my anti-Kavanaugh friends: last week was National Voter Registration Day — before you cast your digital (or literal) stone, did you register to vote?
Carrie Sheffield, a conservative commentator, is the founder of Bold, a digital news network committed to bipartisan dialogue. She is also National Editor for Accuracy in Media, a citizens’ media watchdog whose mission is to promote accuracy, fairness and balance in news reporting.

Alice Stewart: Democrats’ obstruction efforts will come back to haunt them

Alice Stewart

Alice Stewart

If you take a moment to consider the real takeaway from the Kavanaugh confirmation process (a low road to the high court), it was this: elections have consequences. The reality of losing the swing vote in the United States Supreme Court to a second President Trump nominee hit Democrats hard and late. For that reason, nothing was off limits in their unsuccessful efforts to derail the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Fortunately, the silent majority of the conservative-leaning justice supporters won out.
Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations of sexual assault were heartbreaking and her pain was real. Unfortunately, Democrats used her trauma to launch an all-out assault on Judge Kavanaugh’s character. For the left, the ends justified the means in their effort to hold open the Supreme Court seat for their political gain.
Sen. Susan Collins was right to say the process was more like “a gutter level political campaign than a solemn occasion.”
During the 2016 presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton vowed to nominate Supreme Court justices that would protect Roe v. Wade, LGBT rights, and oppose Citizens United.
Donald Trump promised to nominate Scalia-like justices who would defend the Constitution. That’s exactly what he’s doing. The Democrats took their obstruction efforts too far and Republicans responded will full-fledged support for Judge Kavanaugh.
Just like elections have consequences, it’s likely this vitriolic confirmation process will have negative consequences for Democrats in November.
Alice Stewart is a CNN Political Commentator and former Communications Director for Ted Cruz for President
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 06: Sam Ehlinger #11 of the Texas Longhorns smiles as he runs into the endzone for a touchdown against the Oklahoma Sooners in the second quarter of the 2018 AT&T Red River Showdown at Cotton Bowl on October 6, 2018 in Dallas, Texas. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Texas came out victorious in the 2018 edition of the Red River Showdown, defeating Oklahoma, 48-45, at the Cotton Bowl on Saturday.  

Sam Ehlinger shined for Texas, throwing for 314 yards, running for 72 yards and finding the end zone five total times. Receivers Lil’Jordan Humphrey (nine catches for 133 yards and one touchdown) and Collin Johnson (six catches for 81 yards and one touchdown) also played a major role.

Texas’ most recent victory in the Red River Showdown was in 2015. Now, the Longhorns have injected some life into this rivalry once again by ending their skid.

            

Kyler Murray Keeps Heisman Candidacy Alive Despite Loss

Coming off a record-setting performance against the Baylor Bears, Murray had an opportunity to put himself among the front-runners in the Heisman conversation.

Even with the loss, he proved he is deserving of consideration.

It was just a week ago that Murray tied reigning Heisman Trophy winner Baker Mayfield’s school single-game record with seven total touchdowns…in a game he was suspended for the start of. Early on, it appeared it would be more of the same this week as he led the Sooners to an opening-drive touchdown.

However, he struggled in the game’s middle portion. He threw a brutal interception in the first half that led to a Longhorns field goal and would ultimately help Texas gain control of the game. And things didn’t get much better after the break, as Texas ultimately pulled away to a 21-point lead. 

But Murray is a special player who can will his team back into games.

Down 45-24 to his archrival with less than nine minutes to play, Murray didn’t give up. He put his team on his back and went to work. The 5’10”, 195-pound dual-threat star led his team to three consecutive scoring drives to even the score.

And it was his 67-yard run to make it a one-possession game that really sparked the comeback.

Three drives, 178 yards, three touchdowns. And all that with just three minutes and 16 seconds of possession. 

Entering this game, Murray found himself in the company of Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa and Ohio State quarterback Dwayne Haskins among the Heisman favorites. However, Tagovailoa (Texas A&M) and Haskins (TCU and Penn State) have come up big in their top matchups thus far.

Murray had been padding his stats against Florida Atlantic, UCLA, Iowa State, Army and Baylor, but he had yet to face a real test. He got one on Saturday, and his Heisman candidacy remains intact after his fourth-quarter heroics.

Oklahoma still has games against TCU, Oklahoma State and West Virginia, so there will be opportunities for Murray to prove he can lead his team to wins in big games. Coming up small against a rival in the spotlight could prove costly, but don’t sleep on Murray just because of one loss.

                         

Texas Not Yet Title Contenders Despite Signature Victory 

After going 7-6 in Tom Herman’s first year as coach, there were high expectations entering the season in Austin. While the Longhorns didn’t get off to the greatest of starts this season with a home loss to Maryland, they have found a rhythm.

Beating Oklahoma will feed the notion that Texas is back—but doing it in the fashion it did means the result isn’t enough to solidify the Longhorns’ status as College Football Playoff contenders.

The Longhorns had come close to toppling the Sooners in recent years, losing their previous two meetings by five points apiece. But in college football, close doesn’t cut it. Results are all that matter.

Texas entered the Red River Showdown having won four straight games on the season and worked its way back into the Top 25. With victories over then-ranked USC and TCU, the Longhorns had a solid resume, but it had spent too long in the wilderness to be taken seriously.

That changed on Saturday.

After falling behind by a touchdown early, Texas went on a 24-3 run in the first half to take control of the game. The Longhorns offense was virtually unstoppable, and the defense did a solid job of containing Murray for three quarters. The team looked like it could make some noise down the stretch.

And then the fourth quarter happened.

Blowing a 21-point lead in the final nine minutes of the game is tough to overlook regardless of the level of competition. Both the offense and defense fell apart down the stretch, although Ehlinger and Co. came back to life just in time to save the day.

Texas looks like the team to beat in the Big 12 after overcoming Oklahoma on a neutral field on Saturday. That Maryland loss, though, could be tough problematic. No team has ever made it to the College Football Playoff with two losses, meaning the Longhorns will have to run the table to keep their hopes alive.

Texas could face an uphill battle regardless of how it fares the rest of the season. The SEC currently has three teams (Alabama, Georgia and LSU) ranked in the top five, Ohio State has already proved itself by passing a pair of tough tests in TCU and Penn State, and sixth-ranked Notre Dame is currently lurking at 5-0. With Washington (5-1 with a loss to No. 8 Auburn) at the top of the Pac-12, it wouldn’t be far-fetched for Texas to get left out even with a Big 12 title.

The Longhorns would have had a stronger argument had they managed to hold on to their sizable lead and blown the Sooners out. But with a fourth-quarter collapse that nearly cost them, they showed they still have some work to do to be considered among the nation’s best.

            

Big 12 Up For Grabs With Oklahoma Loss

Oklahoma has won the Big 12 each of the past three seasons and was the preseason favorite entering the 2018 season.

After Saturday, though, the Sooners are going to need some help if that streak is to continue.

Only two teams remain undefeated in Big 12 play following the Red River Showdown, Texas (5-1, 3-0) and West Virginia (5-0, 3-0). Oklahoma now falls into a tie with a handful of other teams with one loss in conference play.

The Longhorns and Mountaineers will meet in Morgantown, West Virginia, on Nov. 3. As of now, the winner of that game would have the inside track for the top spot in the conference and possibly be in the conversation for a berth in the College Football Playoff.

College football is no stranger to chaos, so the standings could look completely different when Texas and West Virginia play. But each squad currently has a golden opportunity to grab hold of the conference and end Oklahoma’s reign.

                     

What’s Next

Texas (5-1) will look to build on its momentum as it hosts Baylor on Oct. 13. Meanwhile, Oklahoma (5-1) will have a week to rest before hitting the road to take on TCU on Oct. 20.  

Kavanaugh poised to win confirmation to the Supreme Court

Over the past month, as Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his confirmation team navigated allegations from woman that he had sexually assaulted them in high school and college, a new — and for some, an unfamiliar — dynamic was at play.
Like his beleaguered predecessors, Kavanaugh recognized the President’s own perception of him would largely depend on what he saw on his television screen. But he also recognized it was not Trump’s view that mattered, but the four fence-sitting senators whose votes would determine his fate.
Over the course of a rancorous and divisive three weeks, Kavanaugh has been bolstered by a White House and Republican leadership intent on securing a fifth conservative justice on the high court, reshaping its balance of power. He has also benefited from a long tenure in Washington, with the connections and know-how to run a self-preservation campaign that drew on a close-knit high school community, his colleagues from the Bush era and the conservative media.
What he could not draw upon was a lengthy relationship with the President, who amply defended him but found himself admitting this week he barely knew the man he nominated.
“I don’t even know him, folks. I don’t even know him,” Trump told a campaign crowd in Mississippi on Tuesday. “I met him for the first time a few weeks ago.”
The President’s introduction to Kavanaugh was orchestrated by Don McGahn, the White House counsel who viewed a second Supreme Court nomination process as his final act in the West Wing (the President summarily announced on Twitter in late August that McGahn would depart the administration once Kavanaugh was confirmed). McGahn and Kavanaugh are longtime friends; both served in President George W. Bush’s administration and have deep ties to Washington’s legal community.
In the early stages of Kavanaugh’s nomination, McGahn and a team of White House officials oversaw the judge’s courtesy calls on Capitol Hill and preparations for an initial set of hearings that came and went without much fanfare.
Democrats say Avenatti undercut their case against Kavanaugh

Democrats say Avenatti undercut their case against Kavanaugh

But as the allegations of sexual assault emerged in mid-September, a crisis management approach took hold, with Kavanaugh himself at the center of an effort to repair his reputation and salvage his prospects of becoming a Supreme Court justice. An initial approach that offered firm — but still respectful — denials eventually morphed into the indignant, politically-tinged rebuttal of “smears” that Kavanaugh offered in testimony before the Judiciary Committee.
In statements released through the White House, Kavanaugh’s denials began stoically — “I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation,” he said of Christine Blasey Ford’s claim he sexually assaulted her in high school — but became steadily more forceful: “This is ridiculous and from the Twilight Zone,” he said of Julie Swetnick’s accusations he plied women with alcohol in college.
Meanwhile, Kavanaugh was reaching out himself to former classmates, hoping to ensure they didn’t speak poorly of him to the press. A series of text messages and phone conversations from mid-September reveal how closely Kavanaugh was involved in contacting former Yale classmates who spoke to reporters about allegations of wrongdoing during his college years.

Fox News interview and controversial testimony

Working with White House aides, Kavanaugh agreed to sit for an interview with Fox News four days before his highly anticipated congressional testimony, an unprecedented attempt to humanize the traditionally removed public persona of a Supreme Court nominee.
The interview proved divisive within the White House. Some aides viewed Kavanaugh’s steady denials as a salve for an overheated crisis that was quickly morphing into a debate about women and power. But others, including the President himself, felt Kavanaugh was rigid in his own defense, and that his admission he was a virgin into young adulthood distracting and uncomfortable.
More than anything, aides came to regret the interview because it was largely ineffective, particularly after Kavanaugh disproved the mild-mannered image in his highly-charged testimony days later.
Trump, who felt the Fox interview landed poorly, encouraged the more amped-up tenor during the hearing, according to people familiar with his thinking. Speaking a day before the event, Trump acknowledged he was viewing the matter through the lens of his own experience, which includes dozens of accusations of sexual misconduct over several decades that he has flatly denied.
President Donald Trump's winning streak

President Donald Trump's winning streak

“It does impact my opinion,” Trump said during a rambling press conference in New York, where he was concluding meetings at the United Nations largely overshadowed by the Kavanaugh allegations. “You know why? Because I’ve had a lot of false charges made against me. I’m a very famous person, unfortunately.”
McGahn, who sat behind Kavanaugh in the hearing room, also prodded for a more forceful tone. And that is what emerged during emotional and at moments impetuous testimony.
“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit,” Kavanaugh said, “fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election, fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record, revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left-wing opposition groups.”
It was that very tone which later drew consternation from some of the uncertain senators and even a retired Supreme Court justice.
“The interaction with the members was sharp and partisan and that concerns me,” Sen. Jeff Flake, a key Republican fence-sitter, said on Tuesday in an appearance at The Atlantic Festival in Washington.
In extraordinary criticism of a nominee, Retired Justice John Paul Stevens told a crowd in Boca Raton, Florida, on Thursday there is “merit” in the criticism that Kavanaugh “has demonstrated a potential bias involving enough potential (litigation) before the court that he would not be able to perform his full responsibilities.”

Wall Street Journal op-ed to take the edges off

Those comments, along with a sense among White House officials that key senators had lingering questions over Kavanaugh’s judicial temperament rather than concerns over the sexual assault allegations, led to an op-ed published Thursday evening in the Wall Street Journal.
“I was very emotional last Thursday, more so than I have ever been,” Kavanaugh wrote. “I might have been too emotional at times. I know that my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said.
Kavanaugh writes op-ed arguing he is an 'independent, impartial judge' after emotional testimony

Kavanaugh writes op-ed arguing he is an 'independent, impartial judge' after emotional testimony

The op-ed was met with a mixed reaction at the White House. Some compared it to the earlier Fox interview — a well-intentioned effort to soften the edges around Kavanaugh that nevertheless added, rather than reduced, the swirl of controversy surrounding him.
Two White House officials said it was Kavanaugh’s idea to write the essay, and one official said Kavanaugh made the decision to write the piece against the advice of some on his confirmation team. Aides had argued against introducing a “new variable” to an already perilous equation so close to the confirmation vote. But he pressed forward with the op-ed anyway, believing the Senate needed to hear his mea culpa.
“He penned the op-ed because he felt like it was important for the full Senate to have before it in his own words something that sums up not just the last two weeks but the entire confirmation process and his life’s record,” a source close to Kavanaugh said.

Reaching out to classmates

The decision mirrored Kavanaugh’s steps two weeks earlier to reach out to former classmates as some came forward to speak about their relationships with him decades ago.
Kathleen Charlton, who graduated from Yale in 1987, said a fellow classmate received a call from Kavanaugh several days before The New Yorker published Debbie Ramirez’s allegation that he exposed himself at a dormitory party when he was a freshman at the university. Kavanaugh has vehemently denied Ramirez’s allegation.
In a letter sent Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee, Charlton wrote the Yale classmate indicated that Kavanaugh was calling in the context of Ramirez’s allegation. The classmate stated Kavanaugh wanted to make sure he would say “no bad” if contacted by the press, according to Charlton’s letter.
The classmate said he told The New Yorker he did not remember anything about Ramirez’s allegation, according to the letter.
Former Justice John Paul Stevens suggests Kavanaugh should not sit on Supreme Court

Former Justice John Paul Stevens suggests Kavanaugh should not sit on Supreme Court

When a reporter from another publication contacted the classmate to ask about the phone call the following day, the classmate sent Charlton an angry text on September 21 that stated, “Don’t F—–G TELL (PEOPLE) BRETT GOT IN TOUCH WITH ME!!! I TOLD YOU AT THE TIME THAT WAS IN CONFIDENCE!! AND (the reporter) CALLS ME. WTF!”
The classmate proceeded to write, “She asked me about Brett contacting me. Three people knew that,” according to text messages Charlton shared with CNN on the condition that the classmate’s name not be used.
Charlton sent information about the texts to the FBI on Wednesday.
She said she decided to publicize the texts because she felt Kavanaugh’s communications were manipulative.
“It was obvious to me that Brett was trying to control the narrative of the alleged incident. I knew Deb and I couldn’t imagine her making this up,” Charlton said.
A separate set of text messages obtained by CNN suggest Kavanaugh contacted another Yale graduate regarding Ramirez’s allegations.
On September 23, the day that The New Yorker published its article detailing Ramirez’s allegations, Yale graduate Karen Yarasavage texted a friend and said Kavanaugh asked her to provide a comment for that story.
“Brett asked me to go on record and now New Yorker aren’t answering their phones!” Yarasavage said, according to text messages she sent to Kerry Berchem, who graduated from Yale in 1988. NBC first reported the information in the text messages.
Berchem wrote a memo about the texts and shared it with the FBI and Sen. Richard Blumenthal’s office, according to emails obtained by CNN.
Yarasavage was not quoted in The New Yorker article. In text messages, she said she could not recall if she attended the event described in Ramirez’s allegations.
“I don’t know if I was there. My story is that we were such close friends who shared many intimate details with each other and I never heard a word of this,” Yarasavage said, referring to Ramirez as a friend.
Yarasavage did not respond to CNN’s request for comment.
When asked about the texts, Berchem said, “I am in receipt of text messages from a mutual friend of both Debbie and mine that raise questions related to the allegations. I have not drawn any conclusions as to what the texts may mean or may not mean but I do believe they merit investigation by the FBI and the Senate.”
Both sets of texts were sent in the days leading up to The New Yorker story that first published the allegations. As is normal journalistic practice, Kavanaugh had been contacted by The New Yorker for his response prior to publication, which read in part, “This alleged event from 35 years ago did not happen. This is a smear, plain and simple.”
Kavanaugh poised to win confirmation to the Supreme Court

Over the past month, as Judge Brett Kavanaugh and his confirmation team navigated allegations from woman that he had sexually assaulted them in high school and college, a new — and for some, an unfamiliar — dynamic was at play.
Like his beleaguered predecessors, Kavanaugh recognized the President’s own perception of him would largely depend on what he saw on his television screen. But he also recognized it was not Trump’s view that mattered, but the four fence-sitting senators whose votes would determine his fate.
Over the course of a rancorous and divisive three weeks, Kavanaugh has been bolstered by a White House and Republican leadership intent on securing a fifth conservative justice on the high court, reshaping its balance of power. He has also benefited from a long tenure in Washington, with the connections and know-how to run a self-preservation campaign that drew on a close-knit high school community, his colleagues from the Bush era and the conservative media.
What he could not draw upon was a lengthy relationship with the President, who amply defended him but found himself admitting this week he barely knew the man he nominated.
“I don’t even know him, folks. I don’t even know him,” Trump told a campaign crowd in Mississippi on Tuesday. “I met him for the first time a few weeks ago.”
The President’s introduction to Kavanaugh was orchestrated by Don McGahn, the White House counsel who viewed a second Supreme Court nomination process as his final act in the West Wing (the President summarily announced on Twitter in late August that McGahn would depart the administration once Kavanaugh was confirmed). McGahn and Kavanaugh are longtime friends; both served in President George W. Bush’s administration and have deep ties to Washington’s legal community.
In the early stages of Kavanaugh’s nomination, McGahn and a team of White House officials oversaw the judge’s courtesy calls on Capitol Hill and preparations for an initial set of hearings that came and went without much fanfare.
Democrats say Avenatti undercut their case against Kavanaugh

Democrats say Avenatti undercut their case against Kavanaugh

But as the allegations of sexual assault emerged in mid-September, a crisis management approach took hold, with Kavanaugh himself at the center of an effort to repair his reputation and salvage his prospects of becoming a Supreme Court justice. An initial approach that offered firm — but still respectful — denials eventually morphed into the indignant, politically-tinged rebuttal of “smears” that Kavanaugh offered in testimony before the Judiciary Committee.
In statements released through the White House, Kavanaugh’s denials began stoically — “I categorically and unequivocally deny this allegation,” he said of Christine Blasey Ford’s claim he sexually assaulted her in high school — but became steadily more forceful: “This is ridiculous and from the Twilight Zone,” he said of Julie Swetnick’s accusations he plied women with alcohol in college.
Meanwhile, Kavanaugh was reaching out himself to former classmates, hoping to ensure they didn’t speak poorly of him to the press. A series of text messages and phone conversations from mid-September reveal how closely Kavanaugh was involved in contacting former Yale classmates who spoke to reporters about allegations of wrongdoing during his college years.

Fox News interview and controversial testimony

Working with White House aides, Kavanaugh agreed to sit for an interview with Fox News four days before his highly anticipated congressional testimony, an unprecedented attempt to humanize the traditionally removed public persona of a Supreme Court nominee.
The interview proved divisive within the White House. Some aides viewed Kavanaugh’s steady denials as a salve for an overheated crisis that was quickly morphing into a debate about women and power. But others, including the President himself, felt Kavanaugh was rigid in his own defense, and that his admission he was a virgin into young adulthood distracting and uncomfortable.
More than anything, aides came to regret the interview because it was largely ineffective, particularly after Kavanaugh disproved the mild-mannered image in his highly-charged testimony days later.
Trump, who felt the Fox interview landed poorly, encouraged the more amped-up tenor during the hearing, according to people familiar with his thinking. Speaking a day before the event, Trump acknowledged he was viewing the matter through the lens of his own experience, which includes dozens of accusations of sexual misconduct over several decades that he has flatly denied.
President Donald Trump's winning streak

President Donald Trump's winning streak

“It does impact my opinion,” Trump said during a rambling press conference in New York, where he was concluding meetings at the United Nations largely overshadowed by the Kavanaugh allegations. “You know why? Because I’ve had a lot of false charges made against me. I’m a very famous person, unfortunately.”
McGahn, who sat behind Kavanaugh in the hearing room, also prodded for a more forceful tone. And that is what emerged during emotional and at moments impetuous testimony.
“This whole two-week effort has been a calculated and orchestrated political hit,” Kavanaugh said, “fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election, fear that has been unfairly stoked about my judicial record, revenge on behalf of the Clintons and millions of dollars in money from outside left-wing opposition groups.”
It was that very tone which later drew consternation from some of the uncertain senators and even a retired Supreme Court justice.
“The interaction with the members was sharp and partisan and that concerns me,” Sen. Jeff Flake, a key Republican fence-sitter, said on Tuesday in an appearance at The Atlantic Festival in Washington.
In extraordinary criticism of a nominee, Retired Justice John Paul Stevens told a crowd in Boca Raton, Florida, on Thursday there is “merit” in the criticism that Kavanaugh “has demonstrated a potential bias involving enough potential (litigation) before the court that he would not be able to perform his full responsibilities.”

Wall Street Journal op-ed to take the edges off

Those comments, along with a sense among White House officials that key senators had lingering questions over Kavanaugh’s judicial temperament rather than concerns over the sexual assault allegations, led to an op-ed published Thursday evening in the Wall Street Journal.
“I was very emotional last Thursday, more so than I have ever been,” Kavanaugh wrote. “I might have been too emotional at times. I know that my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said.
Kavanaugh writes op-ed arguing he is an 'independent, impartial judge' after emotional testimony

Kavanaugh writes op-ed arguing he is an 'independent, impartial judge' after emotional testimony

The op-ed was met with a mixed reaction at the White House. Some compared it to the earlier Fox interview — a well-intentioned effort to soften the edges around Kavanaugh that nevertheless added, rather than reduced, the swirl of controversy surrounding him.
Two White House officials said it was Kavanaugh’s idea to write the essay, and one official said Kavanaugh made the decision to write the piece against the advice of some on his confirmation team. Aides had argued against introducing a “new variable” to an already perilous equation so close to the confirmation vote. But he pressed forward with the op-ed anyway, believing the Senate needed to hear his mea culpa.
“He penned the op-ed because he felt like it was important for the full Senate to have before it in his own words something that sums up not just the last two weeks but the entire confirmation process and his life’s record,” a source close to Kavanaugh said.

Reaching out to classmates

The decision mirrored Kavanaugh’s steps two weeks earlier to reach out to former classmates as some came forward to speak about their relationships with him decades ago.
Kathleen Charlton, who graduated from Yale in 1987, said a fellow classmate received a call from Kavanaugh several days before The New Yorker published Debbie Ramirez’s allegation that he exposed himself at a dormitory party when he was a freshman at the university. Kavanaugh has vehemently denied Ramirez’s allegation.
In a letter sent Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee, Charlton wrote the Yale classmate indicated that Kavanaugh was calling in the context of Ramirez’s allegation. The classmate stated Kavanaugh wanted to make sure he would say “no bad” if contacted by the press, according to Charlton’s letter.
The classmate said he told The New Yorker he did not remember anything about Ramirez’s allegation, according to the letter.
Former Justice John Paul Stevens suggests Kavanaugh should not sit on Supreme Court

Former Justice John Paul Stevens suggests Kavanaugh should not sit on Supreme Court

When a reporter from another publication contacted the classmate to ask about the phone call the following day, the classmate sent Charlton an angry text on September 21 that stated, “Don’t F—–G TELL (PEOPLE) BRETT GOT IN TOUCH WITH ME!!! I TOLD YOU AT THE TIME THAT WAS IN CONFIDENCE!! AND (the reporter) CALLS ME. WTF!”
The classmate proceeded to write, “She asked me about Brett contacting me. Three people knew that,” according to text messages Charlton shared with CNN on the condition that the classmate’s name not be used.
Charlton sent information about the texts to the FBI on Wednesday.
She said she decided to publicize the texts because she felt Kavanaugh’s communications were manipulative.
“It was obvious to me that Brett was trying to control the narrative of the alleged incident. I knew Deb and I couldn’t imagine her making this up,” Charlton said.
A separate set of text messages obtained by CNN suggest Kavanaugh contacted another Yale graduate regarding Ramirez’s allegations.
On September 23, the day that The New Yorker published its article detailing Ramirez’s allegations, Yale graduate Karen Yarasavage texted a friend and said Kavanaugh asked her to provide a comment for that story.
“Brett asked me to go on record and now New Yorker aren’t answering their phones!” Yarasavage said, according to text messages she sent to Kerry Berchem, who graduated from Yale in 1988. NBC first reported the information in the text messages.
Berchem wrote a memo about the texts and shared it with the FBI and Sen. Richard Blumenthal’s office, according to emails obtained by CNN.
Yarasavage was not quoted in The New Yorker article. In text messages, she said she could not recall if she attended the event described in Ramirez’s allegations.
“I don’t know if I was there. My story is that we were such close friends who shared many intimate details with each other and I never heard a word of this,” Yarasavage said, referring to Ramirez as a friend.
Yarasavage did not respond to CNN’s request for comment.
When asked about the texts, Berchem said, “I am in receipt of text messages from a mutual friend of both Debbie and mine that raise questions related to the allegations. I have not drawn any conclusions as to what the texts may mean or may not mean but I do believe they merit investigation by the FBI and the Senate.”
Both sets of texts were sent in the days leading up to The New Yorker story that first published the allegations. As is normal journalistic practice, Kavanaugh had been contacted by The New Yorker for his response prior to publication, which read in part, “This alleged event from 35 years ago did not happen. This is a smear, plain and simple.”
See how the senators voted below.

Voted to confirm – Republicans:

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tennessee
Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyoming
Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri
Sen. John Boozman, R-Arkansas
Sen. Richard Burr, R-North Carolina
Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-West Virginia
Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-Louisiana
Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine
Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tennessee
Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Arkansas
Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas
Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyoming
Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa
Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Nebraska
Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona
Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colorado
Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina
Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa
Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah
Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nevada
Sen. John Hoeven, R-North Dakota
Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Mississippi
Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma
Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia
Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisconsin
Sen. John Kennedy, R-Louisiana
Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Arizona
Sen. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma
Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah
Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky
Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kansas
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky
Sen. David Perdue, R-Georgia
Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio
Sen. James Risch, R-Idaho
Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas
Sen. Mike Rounds, R-South Dakota
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida
Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Nebraska
Sen. Tim Scott, R-South Carolina
Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Alabama
Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska
Sen. John Thune, R-South Dakota
Sen. Thom Tillis, R-North Carolina
Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pennsylvania
Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Mississippi
Sen. Todd Young, R-Indiana

Voted to confirm – Democrats

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-West Virginia

Voted against nomination:

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisconsin
Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado
Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Connecticut
Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey
Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio
Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Washington
Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Maryland
Sen. Tom Carper, D-Delaware
Sen. Bob Casey Jr., D-Pennsylvania
Sen. Chris Coons, D-Delaware
Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nevada
Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Indiana
Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois
Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Illinois
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-New York
Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California
Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-New Hampshire
Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-New Mexico
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-North Dakota
Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii
Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama
Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Virginia
Sen. Angus King, I-Maine
Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota
Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont
Sen. Ed Markey, D-Massachusetts
Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri
Sen. Bob Menendez, D-New Jersey
Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Oregon
Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Connecticut
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Washington
Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida
Sen. Gary Peters, D-Michigan
Sen. Jack Reed, D-Rhode Island
Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii
Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-New York
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-New Hampshire
Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minnesota
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan
Sen. Jon Tester, D-Montana
Sen. Tom Udall, D-New Mexico
Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Maryland
Sen. Mark Warner, D-Virginia
Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-Rhode Island
Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon

Vote withdrawn, but opposes nomination

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska

Not voting

Sen. Steve Daines, R-Montana (supports nomination; attending daughter’s wedding)
“I do not believe that Brett Kavanaugh was her assailant,” the Maine Republican told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union” in an interview slated to air on Sunday. “I do believe that she was assaulted. I don’t know by whom. I’m not certain when.”
Ford accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her while the two were in high school, prompting a week’s delay in Kavanaugh’s confirmation to allow the FBI to conduct an investigation into the alleged incident. Kavanaugh has denied all allegations.
Collins reviewed the results of the investigation, which included testimony from 10 different witnesses but not from Ford or Kavanaugh, on Friday. She then voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination and has said that she will vote yes on Kavanaugh’ during the full Senate’s confirmation vote on Saturday.
Collins told Bash that while she found Ford’s testimony “heart-wrenching,” the fact that both Ford and Kavanaugh said they were “100 percent certain” of their statements meant that she had to look to the FBI for additional corroborating evidence.
“I found Dr. Ford’s testimony to be heart-wrenching, painful, compelling, and I believe that she believes what she testified to,” Collins said. “But we also had a case where Judge Kavanaugh came forward and said, ‘I’m 100 percent certain that this did not happen,’ so here you have two people who are each 100 percent certain of what they’re saying under pain of perjury. So then I had to look at the other evidence, and was there corroborating evidence, and that’s why I pushed hard for the FBI to do a supplemental background investigation.”
At the White House on Sunday, Trump lauded Collins’ hard work and “impassioned” speech on the Senate floor Friday announcing how she would vote.
“I thought that Susan was incredible yesterday. You could see how hard she worked, how hard she was working. She didn’t stop,” Trump said. “And I know it for a fact because I spoke with her, she didn’t stop. She gave an impassioned, beautiful speech yesterday. And that was from the heart, that was from the heart.”
“I have great respect for Susan Collins, and I always have,” he added.
CNN’s Liz Stark contributed to this report.
“I do not believe that Brett Kavanaugh was her assailant,” the Maine Republican told CNN’s Dana Bash on “State of the Union” in an interview slated to air on Sunday. “I do believe that she was assaulted. I don’t know by whom. I’m not certain when.”
Ford accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her while the two were in high school, prompting a week’s delay in Kavanaugh’s confirmation to allow the FBI to conduct an investigation into the alleged incident. Kavanaugh has denied all allegations.
Collins reviewed the results of the investigation, which included testimony from 10 different witnesses but not from Ford or Kavanaugh, on Friday. She then voted to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination and has said that she will vote yes on Kavanaugh’ during the full Senate’s confirmation vote on Saturday.
Collins told Bash that while she found Ford’s testimony “heart-wrenching,” the fact that both Ford and Kavanaugh said they were “100 percent certain” of their statements meant that she had to look to the FBI for additional corroborating evidence.
“I found Dr. Ford’s testimony to be heart-wrenching, painful, compelling, and I believe that she believes what she testified to,” Collins said. “But we also had a case where Judge Kavanaugh came forward and said, ‘I’m 100 percent certain that this did not happen,’ so here you have two people who are each 100 percent certain of what they’re saying under pain of perjury. So then I had to look at the other evidence, and was there corroborating evidence, and that’s why I pushed hard for the FBI to do a supplemental background investigation.”