CNN was first to alert Harvard University last week about the allegations against Chris Heaton, 31. Heaton, who was hired in August, was placed on leave last Tuesday, pending a review by Harvard, a university spokesperson said.
This is why people hesitate to report sexual misconduct

Heaton is not named as a defendant in the class-action suit. But he is described as having solicited nude pictures from female athletes at an Indiana diving academy and having sent pictures of his penis to young female athletes there, court documents show.
The athletes complained about the conduct beginning in 2015 to Heaton’s superiors at the Indiana Diving Academy, known as Ripfest, the suit claims.
It follows cases involving sexual misdeeds alleged by athletes against USA Gymnastics and Ohio State University, and comes against the backdrop of the #MeToo movement.
Heaton couldn’t be reached for comment immediately on Tuesday.
Tracey Bird will step in as interim coach during a national search for a successor, the university said.
Graham, who’s positioned himself as vocal Trump ally on Capitol Hill, said he responded: “No, I wouldn’t give this up for anything.”
Trump responded, according to Graham: “Yeah, I didn’t think so — that would be kind of stupid.”
Graham, laughing, described Trump as joking when asking the question.
Former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley announced Tuesday that she was stepping down as US ambassador to the United Nations at the end of the year, leading some to speculate that several top Cabinet-level officials could rotate or leave their position to fill the vacancies.
The South Carolina senator, who’s up for re-election in 2020, told CNN he would say “no” if Trump asked him to serve in the Cabinet.
“I told him when we were playing golf: You don’t want me in the Cabinet,” Graham said. “I don’t want to be in the Cabinet. He likes me, I like him. Sometimes we disagree. I got the best job in town. You can do like 100 things here. I ain’t going nowhere. If the people of South Carolina keep me, I’ll stay.”
Graham, who could be on track to be the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, also told CNN he would be inclined to not move on any Supreme Court nominee in 2020 once the presidential primary season starts. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is leaving that option open in 2020, breaking from his past refusal to move on President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland.
“I’d be very inclined to take it into the next election,” Graham said. “I’d be inclined — once primary season starts to take it into the next presidency.”
Trump was asked by a reporter earlier Tuesday if Graham was “popular enough” to be his next attorney general.
“He is somebody that never asked me that question,” Trump responded. “I think he’s very happy where he is. He’s having a good time. And he really stepped it up. He’s doing great.”

CNN’s Jim Acosta asked the President to clarify comments he made in which he claimed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was accused of sexual assault, faced “a disgraceful situation, brought about by people that are evil.” Kavanaugh has denied the allegations.

Sen. John Thune, the Senate’s No. 3 Republican, told reporters that either Corker or Dina Powell, President Donald Trump’s former deputy national security adviser, would both be a “great” choice to fill the position.
“Corker would be great. Dina Powell would be great,” Thune said when asked if he had a pick for a successor to Haley.
Corker, the Senate Foreign Relations committee chairman, also suggested that Powell could be a potential replacement, but repeatedly refused to rule out taking the job if he was asked.
“Conjecture is really bad for your health,” the Tennessee Republican said, noting that he has had no conversations about it.
“It would make sense to me that Dina would be somebody they would be talking to,” Corker said of Powell, adding that she is “well-respected up here.”
Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, also a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, praised the chairman, saying that, “Corker would do an awesome job,” though he added that it is ultimately “the President’s decision.”
Flake said that he was “surprised” at Haley’s departure, while Corker said that he “wasn’t surprised at all,” and also seemed open to the possibility of Ivanka Trump, the President’s daughter and a White House senior adviser, being named to the role, though he indicated that he didn’t think that was going to happen.
“My guess is that’s not it, but she could be considered,” he said of Ivanka, who appeared to take herself out of the running when she tweeted later in the day that she would not be the replacement.
The President announced Haley’s departure Tuesday morning in the Oval Office. Sitting next to Haley, the President said she had “done an incredible job.” But, he said that she had told him that “by the end of the year, I want to take a little time off. I want to take a break.”
Speaking to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House on Tuesday, Trump said he is considering “numerous people” including Powell, whom he said “is under consideration.”
Trump said that Ivanka would be “dynamite” but he said that he would be “accused of nepotism” if he chose her.
Some Democratic lawmakers were quick to voice criticism of the possibility that the President’s daughter might be named to the post.
“It’s the definition of nepotism,” Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, said. “But let’s cross that bridge when we come to it.”
“I assume the President’s Republican colleagues in the Senate will give him good counsel,” Murphy said.
Graham, who’s positioned himself as vocal Trump ally on Capitol Hill, said he responded: “No, I wouldn’t give this up for anything.”
Trump responded, according to Graham: “Yeah, I didn’t think so — that would be kind of stupid.”
Graham, laughing, described Trump as joking when asking the question.
Former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley announced Tuesday that she was stepping down as US ambassador to the United Nations at the end of the year, leading some to speculate that several top Cabinet-level officials could rotate or leave their position to fill the vacancies.
The South Carolina senator, who’s up for re-election in 2020, told CNN he would say “no” if Trump asked him to serve in the Cabinet.
“I told him when we were playing golf: You don’t want me in the Cabinet,” Graham said. “I don’t want to be in the Cabinet. He likes me, I like him. Sometimes we disagree. I got the best job in town. You can do like 100 things here. I ain’t going nowhere. If the people of South Carolina keep me, I’ll stay.”
Graham, who could be on track to be the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, also told CNN he would be inclined to not move on any Supreme Court nominee in 2020 once the presidential primary season starts. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is leaving that option open in 2020, breaking from his past refusal to move on President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland.
“I’d be very inclined to take it into the next election,” Graham said. “I’d be inclined — once primary season starts to take it into the next presidency.”
Trump was asked by a reporter earlier Tuesday if Graham was “popular enough” to be his next attorney general.
“He is somebody that never asked me that question,” Trump responded. “I think he’s very happy where he is. He’s having a good time. And he really stepped it up. He’s doing great.”
Andrew Miller previously worked as an aide to Stone, a longtime Trump ally who is under scrutiny in the Russia investigation. Miller was subpoenaed earlier this year to testify before the special counsel’s grand jury. Instead of complying, he waged a legal battle to invalidate Mueller’s authority to act as a prosecutor. A federal judge ruled against him, holding him in contempt of court for failing to testify, and he has appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
Asked how he feels about Kavanaugh’s presence on the court, as someone who might be sympathetic to his case, Miller said, “I feel nothing but great. I’m cool as a cucumber now.”
Miller made the comments on a radio show Tuesday morning, when Kavanaugh heard his first oral arguments as a newly minted justice. The program on WBEN in Buffalo, New York, was hosted by former Trump campaign aide Michael Caputo, a staunch Mueller critic who has been questioned as part of the investigation and is partially funding Miller’s legal team.
Earlier in the show, Miller’s attorney said he hoped to take the case to the Supreme Court and predicted that a majority of the justices would support his argument against Mueller’s authority, if they decided to take the case. The probability that Kavanaugh and his colleagues on the court would get to hear Miller’s challenge of Mueller anytime soon is a stretch.
For the case to reach the Supreme Court, Miller would have to lose at the appellate court first. His case is scheduled to be heard by three appellate judges on November 8, and a decision would come later.
Kavanaugh would be “very good on this issue,” Miller’s attorney Paul Kamenar said on WBEN.
“He would be a good ally,” Kamenar said of Kavanaugh, “because he has talked about these cases before in terms of presidential power and limiting the power of the government and has written about this very issue of the constitutionality of the independent counsel.”
Kavanaugh previously worked for independent counsel Ken Starr, whose investigation of President Bill Clinton in the 1990s led to Clinton’s impeachment. But years later, Kavanaugh shifted his views and struck a much more hostile tone against independent prosecutors.
While Mueller is frequently compared to Starr in day-to-day discussions, the law Kavanaugh has weighed in on governed a prosecutor who could exist outside the three branches of the federal government, like Starr did. Mueller operates much differently than Starr, because his office works within the Department of Justice and he reports to the attorney general.
So far, four federal judges — including the one who ruled on Miller’s case at the trial court level — have upheld Mueller’s appointment and authority to bring the cases he prosecuted. Two of the judges were appointed by Democrats and two were tapped by Republicans, including one by President Donald Trump.
While Miller and Trump have a shared goal of opposing Mueller, they don’t have much else in common. Miller worked for Stone, a staunch Trump supporter, during the presidential campaign but they parted ways over Trump, because Miller said he expected that Trump “would leave us high and dry.”
“I’ve never meshed well with his personality,” Miller said on Tuesday’s radio show. “I don’t really like that bulldog way.”
A self-identified Libertarian, Miller mentioned how he had sneaked the Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson into the 2016 Republican National Convention to do TV interviews.
“I just don’t believe in political parties,” Miller said. “Parties crush our political system.”
Miller worked for Stone on and off as a traveling aide, driver and tech guy who handled Stone’s website. Stone-linked political groups paid Miller’s company $14,000 during the 2016 election cycle, according to federal records. He is one of a handful of Stone associates who were interviewed by investigators this year or gave testimony to Mueller’s grand jury. Miller talked for two hours with FBI agents at his Missouri home earlier this year.
Stone styles himself as a political dirty trickster who pushes the limits. But he is adamant that he is not a traitor and would never work with a foreign government to influence US elections.
Miller’s lawyers say he had no contact with Russia or WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign. His comments Tuesday were the first time he has spoken publicly since his case got national attention in June.
In May 2017, Weiner pleaded guilty to one charge of transferring obscene material to a minor in federal court in Manhattan. The charges stem from communications that the former congressman had with a 15-year-old girl on social media sites between January and March 2016.
“This crime was my rock bottom,” Weiner said in court. “I have no excuse. … I victimized a young person who deserved better.”
Weiner was a prominent Democratic congressman before he resigned in 2011 following the release of sexually-charged, and sometimes explicit, text messages he exchanged with women other than his wife. During his run for New York City mayor in 2013, more sexually-explicit exchanges with other women were released before he was soundly defeated in that race.
Weiner’s estranged wife, Huma Abedin, was a top aide to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. The federal investigation into Weiner ended up playing a critical role in the 2016 election when emails potentially relevant to the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email server surfaced on Weiner’s laptop. Former FBI Director James Comey announced the discovery of the emails less than two weeks before election day, only to conclude two days before the balloting that the emails changed nothing in the investigation. Democrats blame that announcement in part for Clinton’s loss.
Weiner was sentenced to 21 months in federal prison, and reported to prison November 6, 2017. He is currently located at FMC Devens in Massachusetts.
His prison term of 21 months would have ended in August 2019, and this new release date is now set for May 14, 2019, according to the website.
“This projected release date includes credit for good conduct time earned and good conduct time that may be earned throughout the remainder of his sentence,” read a statement from the Bureau of Prisons to CNN.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, speaking at the Army’s annual AUSA Meeting Tuesday, said they were “actively preparing for Hurricane Michael.”

“In rapid succession last year, Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria devastated the southern states and territories,” Nielsen said, calling last year “one of the costliest and most damaging seasons for natural disasters in history.”

“We are already witnessing the devastating impacts of Hurricane Lane in Hawaii and Hurricane Florence in the Carolinas.”

Nielsen continued: “We are actively preparing for Hurricane Michael for landfall in the Gulf tomorrow. These types of disasters demand a response beyond what any one agency can handle.”

She said the Department of Homeland Security and Department of Defense were working together with state and local officials.

In May 2017, Weiner pleaded guilty to one charge of transferring obscene material to a minor in federal court in Manhattan. The charges stem from communications that the former congressman had with a 15-year-old girl on social media sites between January and March 2016.
“This crime was my rock bottom,” Weiner said in court. “I have no excuse. … I victimized a young person who deserved better.”
Weiner was a prominent Democratic congressman before he resigned in 2011 following the release of sexually-charged, and sometimes explicit, text messages he exchanged with women other than his wife. During his run for New York City mayor in 2013, more sexually-explicit exchanges with other women were released before he was soundly defeated in that race.
Weiner’s estranged wife, Huma Abedin, was a top aide to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. The federal investigation into Weiner ended up playing a critical role in the 2016 election when emails potentially relevant to the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email server surfaced on Weiner’s laptop. Former FBI Director James Comey announced the discovery of the emails less than two weeks before election day, only to conclude two days before the balloting that the emails changed nothing in the investigation. Democrats blame that announcement in part for Clinton’s loss.
Weiner was sentenced to 21 months in federal prison, and reported to prison November 6, 2017. He is currently located at FMC Devens in Massachusetts.
His prison term of 21 months would have ended in August 2019, and this new release date is now set for May 14, 2019, according to the website.
“This projected release date includes credit for good conduct time earned and good conduct time that may be earned throughout the remainder of his sentence,” read a statement from the Bureau of Prisons to CNN.
“She told CNN exactly how she views millions of Americans who hold different political views than her own,” McConnell said with an incredulous tone during a Senate floor speech. “No peace until they get their way? More of these unhinged tactics? Apparently, these are the left’s rallying cry.”
McConnell was responding to an interview Clinton did with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour, when the former Democratic presidential nominee said her party needs to draw a harder line with Republicans.
“You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about,” Clinton said. “That’s why I believe if we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that’s when civility can start again. But until then, the only thing that the Republicans seem to recognize and respect is strength.”
In his speech, McConnell criticized progressive protesters who swarmed the Capitol in the weeks before the vote on Kavanaugh, a jurist they deeply opposed on ideological grounds long before allegations of sexual assault were raised against him.
Clinton: 'You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for'

In recent days, McConnell has repeatedly painted those protesters as angry “mobs” whose out-of-control actions will actually help Republicans retain their majority in the Senate come Election Day.
“Far left activists decided that the United States Senate and their members should be harassed and intimidated wherever they might be. In a restaurant, with family, getting out of their own car or in their own home,” McConnell said. “Protesters disregarded the men and women of the Capitol Police and the Supreme Court, climbed on states and tried to literally shout down senators right in the middle of a roll call vote.”
Clinton, a former US senator from New York, said Republicans have repeatedly used hard ball tactics to gain power and the Democrats must fight back by winning elections.
“I remember Republican operatives shutting down the voting in Florida in 2000. I remember the swift boating of John Kerry. I remember the things that even the Republican Party did to John McCain in 2000. I remember what they did to me for 25 years — the falsehoods, the lies, which unfortunately people believe,” she said.
“So, when you’re dealing with an ideological party that is driven by the lust for power, that is funded by corporate interests who want a government that does its bidding, it’s — you can be civil, but you can’t overcome what they intend to do unless you win elections,” she added.