The former South Carolina governor was tapped as ambassador to the UN following Trump’s election win despite supporting Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in her state’s all-important 2016 presidential primary and later backing Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

When asked if she would take the job by then-chief of staff Reince Priebus, Haley was intrigued but had some conditions.

First, she told Trump she wanted to be a member of the Cabinet and the National Security Council, privileges enjoyed by her predecessors in the Obama administration. Perhaps most importantly, she wanted the latitude to be herself, to say what she wanted.

“I said ‘I am a policy girl, I want to be part of the decision-making process,'” she told CNN in a 2017 interview, recalling the conversation with Trump. “He said, ‘done.’

And I said, ‘I don’t want to be a wallflower or a talking head. I want to be able to speak my mind.’ He said, ‘That is why I asked you to do this.’ In all honesty, I didn’t think they were going to take me up on everything I asked for. And they gave me all that. So how do you turn that down?”

During her more than a year-and-a-half on the job, she has repeatedly spoken her mind, whether it’s going further on human rights than many of her administration colleagues or denouncing racism at home.

“I was not appointed to serve one party or one interest, but to serve one nation,” Kavanaugh said Monday night during his ceremonial swearing-in at the White House.
“America’s Constitution and laws protect every person of every belief and every background,” he said.
Kavanaugh, 53, began work immediately after his official swearing-in on Saturday evening even as protesters stormed the front steps of the Supreme Court and pounded on the 13-ton bronze doors, furious that he had been confirmed despite a decades-old allegation of sexual assault brought by Christine Blasey Ford.
Fulfilling a promise from his confirmation hearing, Kavanaugh has hired four female clerks — something that no other Supreme Court justice has ever done.
Kavanaugh and his team are settling into the former chambers of Justice Samuel Alito, who moved to the offices vacated by retired Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh will also reunite with six of his former clerks on the US Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia who are currently clerking for other justices.
“He has played a double role in this historic moment,” said former clerk Porter Wilkinson.
“Four of the female clerks currently serving at the Supreme Court were with him at the DC Circuit, and now he’s tipped the balance at the court for the first time with an all-female clerk class,” she said.
The women include a current clerk, Kim Jackson, who graduated from Yale in 2017; Megan Lacy, who had been part of the team working on his nomination at the White House and served previously as counsel to Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley; Shannon Grammell, who clerked for Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson on the 4th Circuit; and Sara Nommensen, who worked in the Department of Justice and is a former student of Kavanaugh’s at Harvard Law School.
Kavanaugh will sit on the far right side of the bench — the seat reserved for the junior-most justice. Next to him will be Justice Elena Kagan, who hired him to teach at Harvard Law when she served as dean.
Kavanaugh knows many of the justices, who all showed up at the White House Monday night. He helped to vet Roberts and Alito when Kavanaugh was working as a lawyer in the White House. He attended the same high school as Gorsuch and has met the others at social and judicial conferences over the years. He has also played basketball in the Supreme Court’s gym, which is jokingly referred to as the “highest court in the land.” Last term he came to arguments at least once to watch a former clerk argue.
So far this term, there are no blockbuster cases on the court’s docket, but significant issues concerning LGBT rights, the Affordable Care Act, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and voting rights issues are percolating through the lower courts.
Kavanaugh is expected to vote with his conservative colleagues on the bench, even on some hot-button issues where Kennedy served as a swing vote. That shift delights judicial conservative who believe the confirmation will be one of Trump’s most lasting legacies.
“Justice Kavanaugh will serve our country admirably on the court because he understands that the very best way to protect human dignity and freedom is by respecting and enforcing the limits on government power contained in our Constitution,” said Leonard Leo, executive vice president of the Federalist Society, who has played a critical role in the selection of conservative judges for the Trump White House.
Kavanaugh’s critics, unhappy with the Senate process, Kavanaugh’s record and the way sexual assault allegations were handled, still plan to continue their protests against him.
“Brett Kavanaugh may look the part when he dons the robe, but Kavanaugh will be an illegitimate justice for as long as he sits on the Court, ” said Brian Fallon, executive director of a group called Demand Justice that opposes Kavanaugh.
“His confirmation is an inflection point in the history of the court; there is no pretending any more that the court is an apolitical institution,” Fallon said.
“The message I’m comfortable with is that accusers go through a lot of trauma and some handle it one way and some handle it the other way,” Haley told CNN’s “State of the Union” anchor Jake Tapper. “Regardless, you never — it’s not something that we want to do, to blame the accuser or to try and second guess the accuser. We don’t know the situation she was going through 35 years ago. We don’t know the circumstances.”
Haley added that “every accuser always deserves the right to be heard, but at the same time, the accused deserves the right to be heard.”
The ambassador’s comments come two days after President Donald Trump deviated from his previously measured comments about a sexual assault allegation recently levied against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh by Christine Blasey Ford.
In a series of tweets Friday morning, Trump questioned the validity of Ford’s accusation in the most direct way since the allegations against Kavanaugh came to light and said his Supreme Court nominee is “under assault by radical left wing politicians.”
“I have no doubt that, if the attack on Dr. Ford was as bad as she says, charges would have been immediately filed with local Law Enforcement Authorities by either her or her loving parents,” Trump tweeted. “I ask that she bring those filings forward so that we can learn date, time, and place.”
McConnell called Trump to say Kavanaugh tweets weren't helpful

Kavanaugh has repeatedly denied the allegation.
Haley, who is preparing for the UN General Assembly meeting later this week, said Washington will get its answers to questions about the alleged assault this week when both Ford and Kavanaugh are tentatively scheduled to speak before Congress regarding the alleged incident.
“We don’t know what the truth is, (what happened) 35 years ago,” she said. “But we’ll find out, and I think that’s the best thing we can do, is hear from both sides and then take it from there.”
Still, National Economic Council chairman Larry Kudlow insisted there was no confusion within the administration about the sanctions issue.
“No,” Kudlow said when pressed by CNN’s Jeff Zeleny about Haley’s comments. “I think the issue here is we have a set of sanctions, and additional sanctions are under discussion but haven’t been determined.”
Asked about Haley’s statement, Kudlow said she may have been confused.
“She got ahead of the curve. She’s done a great job, she’s a very effective ambassador. There might have been some momentary confusion about that,” he said. “But if you talk with Steve Mnuchin at Treasury and so forth, he will tell you the same thing — they’re in charge of this — we have had sanctions. Additional sanctions are under consideration but not implemented.”
Haley announced on CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that the US Treasury Department would formalize additional sanctions on Russia the following day, but The Washington Post reported Monday that Trump had yet to sign off on the move.
White House deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley reiterated the administration was still reviewing potentially new sanctions on CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” later Monday.
“I have never heard anyone talk about it, whisper about it in any way,” Pompeo said Monday in response to a question from CNN’s Jim Acosta.
Section 4 of the 25th Amendment outlines how the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet can remove the President from office if they determine that he “is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.”
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein expects to be fired

Pompeo and Haley’s comments came days after The New York Times reported that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein privately raised the possibility of mounting an effort to invoke the 25th Amendment. His departure is now imminent in the wake of that report, which also said he floated the possibility of secretly recording Trump.
The Rosenstein report added fuel to the notion that many of the President’s top advisers view him as unfit to serve, with an anonymous editorial penned earlier this month by a senior administration official also claiming there had been whispers about the 25th Amendment within the administration.
Noting he has been a member of the Trump administration from the beginning, Pompeo insisted there has never been any discussion about the 25th Amendment and called the question “ludicrous.”
Haley said the notion that Cabinet members are discussing the 25th Amendment is “completely and totally absurd.”
“Literally, I have never once been in the White House where that conversation has happened. I am not aware of any Cabinet member talking about that. It is completely and totally absurd,” Haley said. “Nobody is questioning the President at all. If anything, we’re trying to keep up the pace with him in the fact that he has a lot that he wants to accomplish quickly.”
A broad 63% of American voters approve of her job performance vs. only 17% who say they disapprove in a new Quinnipiac University poll. Twenty percent had no opinion. Her approval spans party lines: 75% of Republicans, 63% of independents and even 55% of Democrats say they approve of how she’s handling her job.
Her support among Democrats is virtually identical to the share of Democrats who approve of Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (56%) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (55%) in the same poll.
White House talking points on Syria before Haley's interview cite intended Russia sanctions

Her strong approval rating dwarfs President Donald Trump’s approval rating of 39%.
Haley’s number climbs higher than those of virtually every active politician on the world stage today. (We should note, though, that approval ratings, which measure job performance, are slightly different than favorability ratings, which tend to hinge more on overall likability.)
Several active politicians, such as former Vice President Joe Biden (58%), Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont (57%) and Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona (54%) do have favorability numbers above 50% in recent CNN polling from December 2017 and January 2018. Former President Barack Obama reached a favorability rating of 66% and former President George W. Bush hit 61% in a CNN survey in January. Defense Secretary James Mattis reaches a 59% approval rating in the same survey.
Haley's retort shows why she's unique in Trump's White House

Haley's retort shows why she's unique in Trump's White House

Haley, a former South Carolina governor, has become a vocal public member of the Trump administration’s foreign policy team, issuing repeated harsh warnings to North Korea and Syria over her 16 months on the job. She’s broken with the President on some controversial topics, such as opposing his proposed “Muslim ban” and drawing a harsher line on US relations with Russia.
Last Sunday, Haley announced that the US was set to impose additional sanctions against Russia in response to the chemical weapons attack in Syria. When the White House later suggested there was some “momentary confusion about that,” Haley issued this terse statement in response: “With all due respect, I don’t get confused.”
It’s worth noting that national security and foreign policy positions tend to be more bipartisan than other roles; Haley was overwhelmingly confirmed by a 96-4 margin in the Senate last January.
Nikki Haley is simply not having it

Nikki Haley is simply not having it

Some US foreign affairs officials are very popular: As secretary of state, Hillary Clinton’s approval rating soared as high as 77% in a CBS News poll in January 2010. Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright earned a 62% favorable rating in a Gallup/CNN/USA Today poll in February 1998.
But others struggle: Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson only managed a 31% favorable rating in an October poll from Quinnipiac University. Former UN Ambassador Susan Rice earned only a 35% favorable rating in a 2012 CNN poll.
This Quinnipiac University poll was conducted from April 20-24, 2018 among 1,193 registered voters. The margin of sampling error is ±3.4 percentage points for the full sample; it is larger for subgroups.
US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley resigned Tuesday directly to President Donald Trump, according to multiple sources familiar with her decision.
A senior State Department official said Haley told her staff this morning.
Teasing an announcement in the Oval Office this morning, Trump called Haley “my friend.”
“Big announcement with my friend Ambassador Nikki Haley in the Oval Office at 10:30am,” he tweeted.
Axios was first to report the news that Haley resigned.
The former South Carolina governor was tapped as ambassador to the UN following Trump’s election win despite supporting Florida Sen. Marco Rubio in her state’s all-important 2016 presidential primary and later backing Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.
When asked if she would take the job by then-chief of staff Reince Priebus, Haley was intrigued but had some conditions.
First, she told Trump she wanted to be a member of the Cabinet and the National Security Council, privileges enjoyed by her predecessors in the Obama administration. Perhaps most importantly, she wanted the latitude to be herself, to say what she wanted.
“I said ‘I am a policy girl, I want to be part of the decision-making process,'” she told CNN in a 2017 interview, recalling the conversation with Trump. “He said, ‘done.’ And I said, ‘I don’t want to be a wallflower or a talking head. I want to be able to speak my mind.’ He said, ‘That is why I asked you to do this.’ In all honesty, I didn’t think they were going to take me up on everything I asked for. And they gave me all that. So how do you turn that down?”
During her more than a year-and-a-half on the job, she has repeatedly spoken her mind, whether it’s going further on human rights than many of her administration colleagues or denouncing racism at home.
This story is breaking and will be updated.
“You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about,” Clinton said in an interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “That’s why I believe, if we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that’s when civility can start again. But until then, the only thing that the Republicans seem to recognize and respect is strength.”
Clinton alluded to previous controversies — like the 2000 election recount to the “swift boat” attacks against John Kerry in the 2004 presidential election to the confirmation of Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh — as evidence of what she sees as hardball tactics by Republicans.
Clinton says Trump remarks at Kavanaugh swearing-in undermine Supreme Court

“I remember what they did to me for 25 years — the falsehoods, the lies, which unfortunately people believe because the Republicans have put a lot of time, money, and effort in promoting them,” Clinton said. “So when you’re dealing with an ideological party that is driven by the lust for power, that is funded by corporate interests who want a government that does its bidding, it’s — you can be civil, but you can’t overcome what they intend to do unless you win elections.”
Clinton said a top priority of a Democratic House and Senate should be to scrutinize President Donald Trump. Asked if Democrats should impeach Trump, Clinton sidestepped.
“The question about impeachment — you know, that will be left to others to decide,” Clinton said. “I want to stop the degrading of the rule of law. The delegitimizing of elections. One of their priorities should be, let’s protect our elections. Let’s make sure that we have electoral security. Let’s end the suppression of voters. So there is a big agenda if the Democrats take over.”
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted that “President Trump and Ambassador Nikki Haley will meet in the Oval Office at 10:30am this morning. This event will be open to the pool”.
Axios was first to report the news that Haley resigned.
This story is breaking and will be updated.
Everything Brown had worn as a pro athlete in New Zealand, where he played for the All Whites, featured logos. He wanted something simpler, made out of natural materials. So he decided to make his own shoes out of wool.
“I got lots of pats on the head,” Brown said, describing the initial response. “I got told to leave that to people that know what they’re doing.”
Motivated by the skepticism, he set out to create a prototype and then launched a Kickstarter fundraising campaign. Within four days he’d raised $120,000.
Brown said he thinks the shoe has tapped into a “fundamental shift” in the way people work and play, a shift in tastes that the overall footwear industry hasn’t yet fully embraced.
After fulfilling the initial orders, Brown teamed up with Joey Zwillinger, who would become his co-founder and co-CEO.
“We took the next 30 days to get alignment,” Zwillinger told CNNMoney. “We did that by writing a pretty big business plan. It was like a 25, 30-page business plan. We really never shared it with anyone but it was about Tim and myself dialoguing and building a great partnership.”

Their sneaker has been wildly popular, especially in the Bay Area, where the company is based. It’s even been called “the most comfortable shoe in the world.”
“I think when we realized that we blew through our first year business plan in a matter of two or three months that we were probably underselling ourselves when we started the business,” Zwillinger said.
Brown and Zwillinger said that they continue to take customer feedback on their products and modify the designs accordingly. They’re both very committed to making the best product they can, and the Allbirds sneaker has undergone 27 changes since launching in 2016.
They also have firsthand experience.
“No one tells you when you start a shoe company, but you have to wear that pair of shoes every single day,” Zwillinger joked.
The partners met through their wives, and that connection has upped the stakes.
“Whatever happened, we couldn’t jeopardize our wives’ friendship,” Brown said.
“That’s been tested at different times along the way, but I think we’ve done a really, really good job and I’m incredibly proud of the partnership I’ve built with Joey.”
The company’s first product is machine-washable wool sneakers, but Brown and Zwillinger describe Allbirds as a textile company that strives to be sustainable and create comfortable gear.
Allbirds has also debuted wool loafers and a line of kids’ sneakers with plans to unveil other products down the line.
That’s why they didn’t include “shoes” or “footwear” in their company name. The name Allbirds actually highlights what’s special about New Zealand, which is where its wool is sourced.
“It turns out that when man first settled in New Zealand in about 1200 — these are the Maoris that first came to New Zealand — there was all birds, no mammals,” Zwillinger said. “We thought it was just this really cool hearkening back to New Zealand before man had come. So ‘Allbirds.'”