She will remain in the administration.
In a statement, press secretary Sarah Sanders said, “Mira Ricardel will continue to support the President as she departs the White House to transition to a new role within the Administration. The President is grateful for Ms. Ricardel’s continued service to the American people and her steadfast pursuit of his national security priorities.”
Sources said the President told advisers Tuesday that he had decided to fire her.
The decision comes a day after first lady Melania Trump’s office issued a surprising statement calling for Ricardel to leave the White House.
This is a breaking story and will be updated.
“Today, I am thrilled to announce my support for this bipartisan bill that will make our communities safer and give former inmates a second chance at life after they have served their time,” Trump said during brief remarks in the Roosevelt Room.
Trump added that the White House pledge “to ‘Hire American’ includes those leaving prison and looking for a very fresh start — new job, new life.”
Trump to announce support for criminal justice overhaul proposal

Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, who has taken on criminal justice reform efforts since joining the White House, was present during the President’s remarks. Also, there was fellow White House adviser and first daughter Ivanka Trump, faith leaders, law enforcement leaders and lawmakers supporting the legislation were also present.
“I’m waiting. I’ll be waiting with a pen and we will have done something that hasn’t been done in many, many years, and it’s the right thing to do,” Trump added.
The President also spoke about Alice Johnson, a first-time nonviolent drug offender whose sentence he commuted over the summer after the case was brought to his attention by reality television star Kim Kardashian.
“I’ll never forget the scene of her coming out of prison after 21 years and greeting her family and everybody was crying. Her sons, her grandsons, everybody was crying and hugging and holding each other. It was a beautiful thing to see, it was a very tough situation,” he said.
Supporters of the FIRST Step Act expect that Trump’s backing will help propel the prison and sentencing overhaul bill through Congress, a push White House officials hope to accomplish during the lame duck session of Congress.
Trump wavered on whether to throw his support behind the bill in recent months, but the sources said he was swayed to back the bill on Tuesday after meeting with Kushner.
The new legislation would eliminate “stacking” provisions that result in offenders serving consecutive sentences for crimes committed using firearms; shorten mandatory minimum sentences, including reverting life imprisonment to a 25-year minimum for those convicted under the “three strikes” provision; and expand the “drug safety valve” to reduce the number of nonviolent drug offenders receiving mandatory minimum sentences.
Proponents of the bill made several changes to it to win backing from law enforcement groups, including excluding individuals convicted of some fentanyl-related offenses from accessing good time prison credits and a compromise provision to modestly expand the definition of a serious violent crime.
He also made it clear that their mission will not involve fending off a hoard of dangerous migrants as Trump insisted in his pre-election rhetoric.
Accompanied by Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, Mattis appeared to take the lead when addressing troops at Donna Base Camp, using the opportunity to encourage those present to block out any outside noise related to politics, and he emphasized the importance of serving as “confidence builders” for Border Patrol officers.
“Now, there’s all sorts of stuff in the news, and that sort of thing. You just concentrate on what your company commander, your battalion commander tells you. Because if you read all that stuff, you know, you’ll go nuts,” Mattis said. “You know what your mission is here. You’ve had to deploy on short notice to a nontraditional location and do your jobs. So you focus on doing that.”
“We were asked by the secretary, due to the number of people coming this way, to back them up. What does that mean? It means that her people do all the work, but we’re standing behind them as a confidence builder,” he added, referring to the request from the Department of Homeland Security to provide support.
Texas border troops' future unclear as initial task nears completion

While touring the base camp, Mattis and Nielsen saw the living conditions of the troops and were given a briefing on the camp’s laundry service.
They also spoke to several service members about their deployment experience thus far, including one woman who told Mattis that her husband was serving overseas and their young child was being cared for by the grandparents.

A stark contrast

The visit by Mattis and Nielsen stands in stark contrast to Trump’s relative silence in recent days on the migrants traveling to the US from Central America, after characterizing their approach as an “invasion” prior to the midterm elections.
Since November 6, Election Day, Trump hasn’t mentioned the so-called caravan in a tweet. He has used the word “border” a single time — in a tweet on Friday in which he included a link to a “Presidential Proclamation Addressing Mass Migration Through the Southern Border of the United States” that said, essentially, that he was trying to push people entering the country illegally to specified ports of entry.
On Wednesday, Mattis sought to distance the US military from the criticism that the President used the deployment to rev up his base prior to the election, emphasizing that the border mission is not unique in a historical context.
“There’s nothing new under the sun,” he said.
“I think many of you are aware that President Wilson 100 years ago, a little over a 100 years ago, deployed the US Army to the Southwest border. That’s over a century ago. The threat then was Pancho Villa’s troops, a revolutionary raiding across the border into the United States, New Mexico, in 1916 and there’s a more recent history of DoD support on the border: It spans four administrations and both political parties,” Mattis added.
He defended the legitimacy of the mission, particularly the task of backing up Border Patrol officers ahead of the migrants’ arrival.
“We determined the missions as absolutely legal and this was also reviewed by Department of Justice lawyers. It’s obviously a moral and ethical mission to support our border patrolmen,” Mattis told reporters prior to visiting the base camp.
While the troops in Texas have largely been tasked with reinforcing border crossing points, largely with concertina wire, Mattis suggested that the deployment serves as a valuable training opportunity.
What Trump has stopped talking about since Election Day

What Trump has stopped talking about since Election Day

When one service member said they were planning a field exercise when they got the call to deploy to the border, Mattis laughed before saying: “We just gave you the best field training exercise possible.”
But when asked about the long and short term plans for the operation, Mattis was able to offer few details.
“Short term right now, get the obstacles in so that the border patrolmen can do what they’ve got to do … longer term, it’s somewhat to be determined,” he said before encouraging troops to “keep the faith in each other, listen to your NCOs and you do what your officers tell you.”

Nielsen under fire

While Mattis repeatedly made clear that the border operation is being led by DHS, Nielsen, for the most part, appeared to take on a secondary role as the two Cabinet secretaries toured the base camp and engaged with troops, seeming to take her cues from Mattis before chiming in.
When she did speak, Nielsen focused her on thanking the troops for their service and partnership in the border operation.
“We thank you for your partnership always. We greatly, greatly appreciate it,” she said. “We are right there with you, we know you’re with us and we greatly appreciate it. So thank you, each and every one of you.”
Nielsen’s trip to the border comes amid indications that she could potentially be out of a job soon.
Trump could ask Nielsen to resign in the coming days, multiple officials familiar with the matter predicted, describing the President’s continued frustration at her handling of his signature issue: immigration and border security.
Mattis has faced a steady wave of rumors in recent months suggesting he too could be replaced but his name has not been mentioned lately as reports circulate that the President has been eyeing potential replacements for several senior positions in his administration — both inside the West Wing and across the Cabinet.
The Camp Fire is one of two major blazes burning in California that have left at least 50 people dead.
Most of the 103 people listed missing by the Butte County Sheriff’s Office are from Paradise, a town of 27,000 north of Sacramento first ravaged by the fire Thursday morning.
More than a quarter of its residents are senior citizens and at least 73 of the missing are 65 or older.
An Alameda County coroner looks for human remains at a burned home in Paradise, California.

“In an effort to better inform the public, this list of reported missing persons is being provided,” a message on the sheriff’s website says. “If you see anyone on the list who is no longer missing please contact us so their name can be removed.”
The Camp Fire has killed at least 48 people since it began last week, and Butte County Sheriff and Coroner Kory L. Honea said he expects more bodies will be found.
“I want to tell you, though, this is a very, very difficult process,” Honea told reporters Tuesday. “There’s certainly the unfortunate possibility that even after we search an area, once we get people back in there, it’s possible that human remains can be found.”
Authorities have requested that 100 National Guard troops join cadaver dogs, mobile morgues and anthropology teams in the grim search and recovery of human remains.
In Southern California, firefighters still are battling the Woolsey Fire, which so far has left at least two people dead in Malibu. Authorities are trying to determine whether a third person, found dead at a burned home in Agoura Hills, also died as a result of that fire, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said.
They’ve also been fighting a new blaze, the Sierra Fire, in San Bernardino County. It started late Tuesday about 50 miles east of Los Angeles near Rialto and Fontana, and by Wednesday morning had burned 147 acres, though no evacuations have been ordered, the San Bernardino County Fire District said.
Before and after photos show how fire reduced Paradise to ashes

Before and after photos show how fire reduced Paradise to ashes

Fire officials said the Sierra Fire was fanned by the Santa Ana winds — strong, dry winds that high-pressure systems push from east to west, from the mountains and desert areas down into the Los Angeles area.
Winds were “particularly strong” Wednesday morning but are expected to weaken by evening, the National Weather Service said.
Meanwhile in Northern California, forecasters have said the winds fueling the Camp Fire would slowly begin to decrease Wednesday and give firefighters a reprieve.

Residents desperate to come back

For hours, Carmen Smith waited Tuesday at a roadblock outside Paradise, hoping someone would help her get home and retrieve her husband’s medicine.
“I thought I was going to go home because I work at the hospital and we had to evacuate all the people, and I go, ‘Oh, I’m coming back home,’ but I did not know it was this bad,” Smith told CNN affiliate KCRA. “The fire was right there.”
How to help victims of the California wildfires

How to help victims of the California wildfires

Smith and others are wondering when they can go back to get medicine and clothing or simply to check on the damage.
“I don’t know what to do here,” Charles Terry told KCRA. “I need to get that stuff out of the house.”
Some residents have returned to what’s left of their gutted homes, but many have not. Authorities say downed power lines, busted gas lines and melted roads could endanger them.
California Highway Patrol Chief Brent Newman asked for the public’s patience as teams clear affected areas.
“It is not a safe environment whatsoever,” he said.
Authorities said they don’t yet know when residents will be able to get closer to their homes.
In Southern California, the Los Angeles County sheriff expressed empathy for residents waiting to return to the remains of the few hundred homes destroyed by the Woolsey Fire.
He took a helicopter tour of the burned areas and posted aerial photos of the destruction to Twitter.
“We see the frustration of (people) trying to get back into their homes & appreciate their cooperation,” Sheriff Jim McDonnell wrote.

A look at the wildfires’ astonishing numbers

• Camp Fire: The Camp Fire has destroyed 7,600 homes and scorched 135,000 acres in Northern California. As of Wednesday morning, the inferno was 35% contained.
• Woolsey Fire: This Southern California blaze has torched 97,620 acres and destroyed at least 483 structures. As of Wednesday morning, the inferno was 47% contained.
• Hill Fire: A second Southern California blaze has burned 4,531 acres and was 94% contained as of Wednesday morning
• Rising death toll: There have been 50 deaths statewide, with the vast majority in Northern California. Southern California’s Woolsey Fire has claimed two lives.
• A devastating week for the Golden State: More than 230,000 acres burned in California in the past week. That’s larger than the cities of Chicago and Boston combined. And in 30 days, firefighters have battled more than 500 blazes, said Cal Fire, the state’s forestry and fire protection agency.

Federal officials visit

President Donald Trump received a briefing about the fires from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Brock Long, who were in California.
The two officials told reporters the Camp Fire was one of the worst disasters they have seen.
Zinke also said this is not the time to cast the deadly fire in a political light or cast blame.
He said he wanted the focus to be on checking with families and residents, and to continue to work with state and local partners throughout the recovery phase.
“This is not just a state issue. It’s not a federal issue. This is an American issue of managing our forests,” he said.
The astonishing numbers behind the California wildfires

The astonishing numbers behind the California wildfires

Zinke cited several reasons for the increase in devastation including dead and dying timber and beetle infestation. He stopped short of blaming climate change.
He said prescribed burns are a start and that “the best scientists are looking at best practices.”
After viewing the decimated town of Paradise, Long said a lot of planning will go into reconstructing the town.
“This is a very complex disaster. Probably one of the most complicated disasters this nation has ever seen when it comes to Paradise,” he said.

Man used hose to save his Paradise home

Brad Weldon grabbed a garden hose as the Camp Fire approached his house last week, spraying water to keep the flames at bay and protect his disabled, elderly mother.
He had stayed in Paradise for his 89-year-old mother, who is blind and was unwilling to leave.
“There was times we were laying on the ground pouring the water on ourselves so we didn’t burn,” Weldon, 62, recalled Tuesday.
The water to the hose lasted four hours, and unlike many in the Northern California town, Weldon, his family and home survived mostly unharmed.
The house is remarkably unscathed, save for some scorching on the back of a work shed.
“It feels good to have it. I feel so sad for everyone, though. Everybody I know lost everything,” he said while crying for his neighbors.

Hundreds of thousands are displaced

More than 300,000 people have been forced from their homes statewide. Most of those live in Los Angeles County, where 170,000 were evacuated.
The evacuees included celebrities who lost their homes in Malibu as well as first responders who are still working despite their own homes being destroyed.
Thomas Hirsch was searching the burned remains of his childhood home Tuesday in Malibu, looking for anything salvageable. His parents — who are 97 and 94 — still live there and plan to rebuild, he said.
“We’re survivors. We’ll rebuild, we’ll come back and take whatever little insurance money they had, clean it off, rebuild it and make it nicer than it was before,” he said.
More than 9,000 firefighters are battling wildfires across California, including many from out of state.
Cal Fire tweeted a map showing all the states where firefighters are coming from — including Alaska, Indiana and Georgia.
“Cal Fire wants to recognize the many out of state partners that have joined in battling these wildfires,” the agency said.
Correction: This story has been updated to give the correct age for Brad Weldon’s mother.
The filing, from both the special counsel team and an attorney for Gates, told a federal judge in Washington not to begin sentencing yet, as Gates “continues to cooperate with respect to several ongoing investigations.”
The attorneys said they did not plan to submit another report to the judge until January 15.
Gates was a longtime associate of Manafort’s and was Manafort’s deputy during Trump’s 2016 campaign.
Gates was among those initially charged last year by Mueller, and he pleaded guilty to two charges last February. His testimony against Manafort made up a substantial portion of the former campaign chairman’s Virginia trial in August, where Manafort was found guilty on eight counts of financial crimes. Manafort himself pleaded guilty in September in a separate case and agreed to cooperate with the Mueller investigation.
Gates’ attorney said as recently as last month that his client was continuing to cooperate with the investigation, and Wednesday’s joint filing submitted by Mueller showed that cooperation was continuing still.
“Today, I am thrilled to announce my support for this bipartisan bill that will make our communities safer and give former inmates a second chance at life after they have served their time,” Trump said during brief remarks in the Roosevelt Room.
Trump added that the White House pledge “to ‘Hire American’ includes those leaving prison and looking for a very fresh start — new job, new life.”
Trump to announce support for criminal justice overhaul proposal

Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, who has taken on criminal justice reform efforts since joining the White House, was present during the President’s remarks. Also, there was fellow White House adviser and first daughter Ivanka Trump, faith leaders, law enforcement leaders and lawmakers supporting the legislation were also present.
“I’m waiting. I’ll be waiting with a pen and we will have done something that hasn’t been done in many, many years, and it’s the right thing to do,” Trump added.
The President also spoke about Alice Johnson, a first-time nonviolent drug offender whose sentence he commuted over the summer after the case was brought to his attention by reality television star Kim Kardashian.
“I’ll never forget the scene of her coming out of prison after 21 years and greeting her family and everybody was crying. Her sons, her grandsons, everybody was crying and hugging and holding each other. It was a beautiful thing to see, it was a very tough situation,” he said.
Supporters of the FIRST Step Act expect that Trump’s backing will help propel the prison and sentencing overhaul bill through Congress, a push White House officials hope to accomplish during the lame duck session of Congress.
Trump wavered on whether to throw his support behind the bill in recent months, but the sources said he was swayed to back the bill on Tuesday after meeting with Kushner.
The new legislation would eliminate “stacking” provisions that result in offenders serving consecutive sentences for crimes committed using firearms; shorten mandatory minimum sentences, including reverting life imprisonment to a 25-year minimum for those convicted under the “three strikes” provision; and expand the “drug safety valve” to reduce the number of nonviolent drug offenders receiving mandatory minimum sentences.
Proponents of the bill made several changes to it to win backing from law enforcement groups, including excluding individuals convicted of some fentanyl-related offenses from accessing good time prison credits and a compromise provision to modestly expand the definition of a serious violent crime.
A Dallas Cowboys helmet is seen on the field before an NFL football game against the New York Giants at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, NJ, Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. (Winslow Townson/AP Images for Panini)

Winslow Townson/Associated Press

Former Dallas Cowboys linebacker Jeff Rohrer publicly came out as gay in an interview with Outsports’ Cyd Zeigler published on Wednesday. 

According to Zeigler, Rohrer will marry his partner, Joshua Ross, on Sunday in Southern California. The two have been together for over two years.

Rohrer spent six seasons with the Cowboys, appearing in 83 games between 1982 and 1987.

      

This article will be updated to provide more information on this story as it becomes available.

Get the best sports content from the web and social in the new B/R app. Get the app and get the game.

Guillaume, a junior focusing on African-American studies along with history and literature, has served as one of the paper’s central administration reporters, during which time she covered Harvard’s presidential search and interviewed two university presidents.
Founded in 1873, the Crimson bills itself as the nation’s oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. Past Crimson editors include Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy and many leading journalists, among them CNN President Jeff Zucker.
Guillaume grew up in Queens, New York, where she attended Townsend Harris High School. She is one of three chairs of the Crimson’s Diversity and Inclusivity Committee, which this year has focused on recruiting editors from marginalized backgrounds.
“If my election has validated anyone’s experience or validated anyone’s belonging in Crimson, then my hard work will be worth it and will continue to be worth it,” Guillaume said.
It’s a message she hopes her new post will convey: Everyone should feel like they belong at the newspaper and the university, no matter their background, race, ethnicity, gender orientation or sexual identity.
“At Harvard you’re in a space that was made for white men, so if you’re not the cookie-cutter white man who Harvard was built for, it can be difficult to navigate being here,” she said.
“I want people to think about how to navigate, and feel like they can and get through their education and feel like they do belong here. That’s a big thing for me.”
It was country college night at Borderline on November 7 when the shooting broke out late in the evening. The bar was packed with patrons who were dancing, playing pool and watching the Lakers game. The victims included a veteran sheriff’s deputy, a survivor of last year’s mass shooting in Las Vegas and a college student.
How a night out turned into a night of horror at a bar in California

Ten died from multiple gunshot wounds, a press release from the medical examiner’s office said. Two people were killed by single gunshot wounds.
Justin Meek was killed by a gunshot wound to the thorax and Cody Gifford-Coffman was shot in the head.
The manner of death was homicide for all 12 victims. Ian David Long’s manner of death was suicide caused by a gunshot wound to the head.
Two will be laid to rest this week.
Maya Berry

Kai Wiggins

Kai Wiggins

According to statistics from the Federal Bureau of Investigation released this week, the number of reported hate crime incidents in 2017 was up 17% over 2016 totals, representing the first consecutive three-year annual increase and the largest single-year increase since 2001, when hate crimes targeting Arab-Americans and American Muslims, and those perceived to be Arab or Muslim, surged in the aftermath of 9/11.
We know that in 2017, as in 2016 and 2015 before, the increase coincided with burgeoning racism, xenophobia and anti-Semitism. The FBI’s information shows that crimes motivated by race or ethnicity, which rose 18% in 2017, accounted for a majority of all incidents reported, with hate crimes specifically targeting African-Americans representing the greatest share, while anti-Arab hate crimes increased 100%. As for crimes motivated by religion, anti-Jewish incidents surged yet again last year, this time over 37%, while anti-Muslim incidents, which stabilized after two years of dramatic rise, remained well above historical averages from before the 2016 election cycle.
But despite the reported increase, we know that many incidents, including some of the most horrific acts of bias-motivated violence committed last year, are somehow missing from the official statistics.
Hate crimes increased by 17% in 2017, FBI report finds

Hate crimes increased by 17% in 2017, FBI report finds

The murder of Heather Heyer is missing. According to the FBI data, the Charlottesville, Virginia, Police Department reported no hate crimes between July and September of last year. But on August 12, 2017, Heyer was killed in Charlottesville when a man plowed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally. An additional 35 people were injured, and the accused driver, James Alex Fields Jr., is awaiting trial on federal hate crime charges. He pleaded not guilty.
The killings of Ricky John Best and Taliesin Myrddin Namkai-Meche are missing. According to FBI statistics, no hate crime murders were reported in Oregon last year. But on May 26, 2017, Best and Namkai-Meche were killed on a train in Portland when a man fatally stabbed them and wounded Micah David-Cole Fletcher after they confronted him for harassing two teenage passengers with anti-Muslim and racist slurs. The accused attacker, Jeremy Joseph Christian, was indicted on the state hate crime charge of “second degree intimidation” and pleaded not guilty.
The murder of Srinivas Kuchibhotla is missing. According to FBI statistics, no hate crimes were reported last year in Olathe, Kansas. But on February 22, 2017, Kuchibhotla was killed at a bar in Olathe when a man shot him because of his perceived national origin. His friend Alok Madasani was also targeted but survived the shooting, as did a man named Ian Grillot who attempted to intercede. The shooter, Adam Purinton, was convicted on federal hate crime charges.
The 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht is a somber reminder

The 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht is a somber reminder

While all three cases were prosecuted as hate crimes, this detail is not relevant to whether they should have been reported in the FBI data. According to federal guidance on hate crime reporting, it is the responsibility of law enforcement officials responding to an incident to determine whether there was any indication that it was bias-motivated. After a secondary review, and regardless of whether any hate crime charges are brought, the relevant agency may then report the incident as a hate crime through the Uniform Crime Reporting, or UCR, system, which the FBI uses to publish its annual report.
We should also note that negligence on the part of responding law enforcement officials is not necessarily the cause of these apparent omissions. While the Portland Police Bureau was not immediately available for comment, the Olathe Police Department confirmed it had reported six hate crime incidents, including the murder of Kuchibhotla, which was recorded as an “Anti-Other Ethnicity/National Origin” incident, to the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. Because the Olathe Police Department and agencies from other jurisdictions submit hate crime data using an antiquated reporting format, the KBI said it was unable to aggregate these incidents into the data collections submitted to the FBI. As for Charlottesville, the department did not return a recent request for comment but had told us in a September statement that the Heyer case and others relating to the white nationalist rally would be reported as hate crimes, but it appears they were not finalized in time for inclusion in the official state or federal data.
In some states, including Virginia and Oregon, state UCR programs publish annual hate crime statistics. Like the FBI statistics, Virginia’s annual hate crime report contains no data relating to the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. However, and in seeming contradiction with the federal data, state-level statistics from Oregon include two hate crime murder offenses reported in Multnomah County. But without additional information, we are unable to determine whether either of these offenses corresponds to the May 26 stabbing.
No, Cindy Hyde-Smith, hanging is no joke

No, Cindy Hyde-Smith, hanging is no joke

Additional findings from state-level statistics raise questions about the FBI data. In advance of this week’s FBI release, the Arab American Institute collected UCR hate crime data from 27 states and the District of Columbia. Based on these state-level statistics, we predicted a significant nationwide increase reported in 2017 federal statistics. While the overall prediction was correct, much like in the case of Oregon, we found some notable discrepancies. According to the FBI data, just 48 incidents were reported in Maryland in 2017, but state-level statistics indicate a far greater total of 183. Similar disparities occurred in multiple states, including Indiana. While FBI statistics contained no data from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, according to state UCR data, the department reported 44 incidents in 2017.
The federal data, as aggregated by the Arab American Institute and also the Anti-Defamation League, reveal that nearly 100 jurisdictions representing at least 100,000 people reported zero hate crimes in 2017. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, which has reported as many as 73 incidents annually in recent years and represents over 1.6 million people, is one example. Statewide, just five incidents were reported in Nevada in 2017.
But the problem of questionable or underreported data is not limited to any one state. Hawaii does not even participate in the national hate crime statistics program, and aside from Nevada, an additional 11 participating states had fewer than 10 agencies report hate crime incidents in 2017. Many of these states, such as Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia and Mississippi, have dark histories of racial and ethnic violence but have not enacted sufficient legislation to address hate crime. If all states offered inclusive protections in their hate crime laws, required hate crime reporting and data collection from law enforcement, and authorized comprehensive police training on investigating and reporting hate crime incidents, maybe then we would have more accurate and representative federal statistics.
A renewed commitment from the federal government would also help. In order to improve the data collected under the Hate Crime Statistics Act and published in the FBI’s annual report, Congress should pass legislation that provides law enforcement with incentives for hate crime reporting and ties federal funding for state or local agencies to the provision of accurate data.
Until then, we will continue to highlight what the data show, and bring what’s missing to light.