As part of his closing argument, former Vice President Joe Biden said that Sunday this election is the most critical of voters lifetimes.

“This is so important for our kids. This is the most important election you’ve ever been part of, no matter how old or how young you are. The very character of our nation is on the ballot Tuesday,” Biden said in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he stumped for Gov. Tom Wolf and congressional candidate George Scott.

Touching on the rise of white supremacy and anti-Semitism, Biden called out President Donald Trump for placing a moral equivalence between the white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, last year and those who opposed them.

“We are in a battle for America’s soul,” Biden said. “When hatred is given a chance to fester, it gives license for others to come out of the darkness. When this distorted worldview is fueled online, it spreads, ladies and gentlemen. And when the President of the United States of America assigns, as he did, a moral equivalence between those dark forces and those opposing them, that puts fuel on the fire of intolerance and legitimates people who should never be heard.

“Our children are listening and they’re watching. And our silence is complicity. Silence is complicity,” Biden said. “But folks, we will not be silent.”

The former vice president said voters this cycle needed to do something different than they ever have during his career.

“We have to reset the moral compass of this nation,” Biden said. “That’s what Tuesday is about.”

CNN’s Kate Sullivan contributed to this report.

Green Bay Packersvs

New England Patriots logoNew England Patriots

1:20am UTC Nov 5, 2018Foxborough

Maurice Moton

The New England Patriots (6-2) will host the Green Bay Packers (3-3-1) at Gillette Stadium for Sunday Night Football in a battle between the 12s. The matchup features arguably the top two quarterbacks in the game, Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady. The Packers look to avoid their first two-game skid of the season, following a 29-27 loss to the Los Angeles Rams. The Patriots have won five consecutive games and lead the AFC East. They’re also undefeated at home (4-0) this year.

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It’s his third recent national ad for the midterms but the first in which Bloomberg himself has appeared.
Unlike previous ads the billionaire has funded this election cycle, the latest one features Bloomberg himself. Speaking directly to the camera and citing recent politically-charged violence and fear mongering over immigration, Bloomberg urges Americans to vote for Democratic candidates.
“Political violence tears at the heart of our democracy. And violence against a religious group, in a house of God, tears at the heart of our humanity. At these moments of great national tragedy, we look to Washington to lead… we expect a plan,” says Bloomberg.
His appearance in the ad, which will air for the first time on CBS’s “60 Minutes,” will stoke further speculation that he’ll seek a presidential run in 2020.
In an exclusive interview with CNN last week, Bloomberg, who has spent roughly $110 million to help Democrats win control of Congress, sharply criticized President Donald Trump’s response to the deadly mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue, saying Trump is partly responsible for the rise in hate and violence.
Bloomberg blames Trump for 'inciting' hate after Pittsburgh shooting

“When he goes around getting people to scream and hate, bad things happen, and you saw the results here,” said Bloomberg. He went on to say that the President “should be unifying and instead he is exciting people, inciting people.”
The ad will air on CNN, MSNBC and major broadcast television networks through Monday, according to a news release announcing the ad.
“The country is deeply divided. The president and Republicans are fueling that division, and that holds us back as a nation. I’m unwilling to sit by and accept it,” said Bloomberg in the release.

Written by Alexxa Gotthardt, Artsy

This article was published in partnership with Artsy, the global platform for discovering and collecting art. The original article can be seen here.
In 1964, Norman Rockwell‘s Civil Rights-era painting “The Problem We All Live With” depicted Ruby Bridges, the six-year-old black girl, who entered an all-white school in 1960, walking between deputy U.S. marshals with volleyed tomatoes and a racial slur staining the wall behind her. In 2015, artist Maggie Meiners reimagined the famous composition to explore the plight of another youth: this time, a Dreamer — a child of undocumented immigrants given temporary protection under the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

In the photo, which she titled “Dream Act” (2015), Meiners directed actors and models to depict the scene of a young immigrant girl, standing alone and surrounded by a squadron of U.S. border-patrol agents. While Meiners created the image three years ago, it found new relevance under the current U.S. administration’s “Zero Tolerance” policy, enacted this spring, which resulted in immigrant children being separated from their parents at the U.S. border.

“Dream Act” wasn’t Meiners’s first Rockwell-inspired work. The artist has long been fascinated by the painter’s depictions of 20th-century American life, which charmed and shocked millions in the mid-1900s, and their power to adeptly illustrate an entire era.

Along with Rockwell’s arresting scenes of daily life — town gossips spreading the good word; a zookeeper on his lunch break while a lion eyes his peanut butter sandwich — were works that depicted timely, charged issues, like Civil Rights-era desegregation. In the process, his works came to embody American culture of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, and the social issues Rockwell and his peers were grappling with.

"Freedom from Fear" (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners

“Freedom from Fear” (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners Credit: Maggie Meiners

When Meiners visited the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in 2010, she couldn’t help but wonder what Rockwell’s paintings would look like if they’d been made today — a thought that laid the groundwork for “Revisiting Rockwell,” her photo series that reimagines the legendary painter’s canvases in a contemporary context.

Meiners was facing “Freedom from Want” (1941-1943), one of Rockwell’s most famous works, when the idea struck her. The painting depicts an idealistic Thanksgiving dinner, in which several generations of a middle-class white family gather around a long table crammed with requisite side dishes (cranberry sauce and the like) as the matriarch serves a massive, glistening turkey.

When Rockwell made the piece for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post, he set out to portray traditional family values — the starry-eyed kind included in then-president Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 1941 State of the Union address, known as “Four Freedoms.”

"Freedom of Religion" (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners

“Freedom of Religion” (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners Credit: Maggie Meiners

As Meiners studied the painting, she pondered what an ideal American family looked like in 2010 — and, more poignantly, “who gets to decide what an ideal family is,” she told Artsy, from her home in Chicago’s suburbs. “What if you’re an orphan? What if you’re adopted? What if you’re gay?”

At the time, the state of California had recently overturned Proposition 8, the controversial same-sex marriage ban, and gay rights were on Meiners’s mind. The court’s decision gave the artist hope that narrow definitions of family were expanding, and she wanted to illuminate the shift.

Meiners has a background in cultural anthropology, so before executing a Rockwell reboot, she wanted to take a deeper dive into the the social forces that informed Rockwell’s work. She began researching his practice and the political climate of his time, and realized that many of the topics that Rockwell depicted (parenting, generational divides, freedom of speech, race relations) could be tweaked to reflect contemporary culture.

"Freedom from Want" (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners

“Freedom from Want” (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners Credit: Maggie Meiners

From there, Meiners chose a number of paintings and illustrations to adapt for “Revisiting Rockwell.” Her selections were based on two factors. First, “it was about what I could actually execute,” she recalled. Restaging Rockwell’s compositions would be a complicated process, as many are filled with 10 or more subjects set against detailed backdrops. More importantly, though, a given piece needed to depict a subject that was “translatable to something that’s going on today,” she said. “I asked myself: ‘What can I say now that’s a little different than what was said in Rockwell’s time?'”

"Skin Deep" (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners

“Skin Deep” (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners Credit: Maggie Meiners

To ease into the series, Meiner temporarily shelved her plan for an updated Thanksgiving scene and started with Rockwell’s “The Tattoo Artist” (1944), a painting that portrays just two people (logistically, this would be easier to restage with sets and models than more complex, larger works). While Rockwell’s piece shows a male sailor getting inked — the names of six past lovers on his muscled arm crossed out in favor of the newest, “Betty” — Meiner trades Rockwell’s macho protagonist with a woman, toppling 1940s gender dynamics in the process. In her version, a woman can proudly brandish tattoos and boast many past lovers, too.

Soon after, Meiners took on the rendition of “Freedom from Want” (1943), placing a gay couple at the head of the Thanksgiving table. Next was the lighthearted “It Went Viral” (2012-2017), in which Meiners restaged Rockwell’s famous “The Gossips” (1948), replacing the landlines that townspeople use to play a game of real-world “telephone” with big, glowing smartphones.

"It Went Viral" (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners

“It Went Viral” (2012-2017) by Maggie Meiners Credit: Maggie Meiners

However, most of Meiners’s works in the series, like 2015’s “Dream Act,” strike a decidedly more serious tone. Her transformation of Rockwell’s “Freedom from Fear” (1943) is particularly powerful. In his painting, parents tuck their children into bed while holding a newspaper emblazoned with all-caps World War II-era headlines, telling stories of widespread bombing overseas. Meiners replaces the white family with a black mother and her two young sons, who face violence that exists much closer to home. She grasps a copy of the Chicago Tribune, bearing the headline “Another Black Youth Shot,” referring to police violence and structural racism in America.

Like “Dream Act,” Meiners’s photographs are meant to provoke discussion. Her work often deconstructs and reconstructs American iconography and visual history. And though it took three years for “Dream Act,” to make waves on the internet, the impact was profound. Hollywood actress Jennifer Garner even posted it on her Instagram account on June 29th. Under it, her caption read: “This photograph from @maggiemeinersprojects #revisitingrockwell collection tells you everything you need to know in a glance. Kids belong with parents.”

The popularity of Meiners’s “Dream Act,” and the controversy it reflected, resembles the public response to Rockwell’s most probing, incisive works. And that, of course, was Meiners’s hope for “Revisiting Rockwell.”

“That was my big takeaway from this project: things change,” she said. “But there’s always something else that needs to be worked on.”

Speaking in Macon, Georgia, on Sunday afternoon, President Donald Trump continued to use the contentious confirmation hearings of Brett Kavanaugh in an effort to rally voters to support Republican candidates. 

He used the allegedly recanted claim of a little-known accuser to question the credibility of Kavanaugh’s other accusers without mentioning them by name.

The allegation he referred to received little to no attention, unlike the allegation from Christine Blasey Ford, who appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer questions about her accusations of sexual assault against the judge. Kavanaugh has denied Ford’s allegations.

“A woman who accused then-Judge Kavanaugh of horrible, horrible crimes admitted that actually she never met Judge Kavanaugh or Brett Kavanaugh or Kavanaugh period. Never met him. Never saw him,” Trump said of the little-known accuser on Sunday. “It was a total lie. She made up the story, and she was forced to admit it.”

The crowd then broke out in “lock her up” chants.

Trump made similar remarks on Saturday at a Montana rally, dwelling extensively on Kavanaugh’s confirmation — and repeatedly misleading the crowd about the allegations against the judge, blaming Democrats for a “filthy, dirty lie.”

The little-known case Trump has seized on came to light in a referral from Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley. Grassley, an Iowa Republican, referred the accuser, Judy Munro-Leighton to the Justice Department and FBI for investigation for potentially making false statements and obstruction. Grassley claimed that Munro-Leighton confessed to committee investigators that she had never met Kavanaugh and admitted her allegation was a “ploy” and “tactic” because she opposed the judge’s nomination.

CNN’s Eli Watkins, Jeremy Diamond and Veronica Stracqualursi contributed to this report.

(CNN) — No one needs help finding a beautiful beach in Mauritius, but there’s tons to explore away from the water as well.

For a small nation, Mauritius overflows with scenic hikes through the mountains, holy pilgrimage sites, amazing food and historic areas that trace the island’s globe-spanning history.

Underwater waterfall

Just off the coast of Le Morne, on the island’s southwest, Mauritius offers a spectacular illusion.

Sand and silt on the ocean floor run off in a way that makes it look like they’re pouring down a waterfall — or like the entire island is being sucked down a vast drain.

It’s really just the flow of underwater currents that create the dramatic image. The ocean water is spectacular from the shore, but to see this particular view requires a helicopter ride. Tours are set up just for that.

Chamarel Colored Earth

Mauritius Charamel3

Chamarel’s colored sands are caused by lava turning into clay minerals.

Grey Hutton/Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority

On an exposed hilltop inside a park, the earth takes on magical rainbow hues of purple, red, violet, green, blue and yellow.

The colors are most vibrant at sunrise, and they appear to shift during the course of the day as the sun moves and clouds pass overhead. Nearby, a narrow waterfall plunges over a cliff, and the Black River Gorges National Park nearby protects what remains of the island’s original rainforest.

Pereybere beach

Peyebere Beach, Mauritius

Some of the best diving and snorkeling in Mauritius is located off Pereybere beach.

guichaoua / Alamy Stock Photo

Because there’s got to be one beach on this list, we’ve tracked down the best.

Just past the tourist buses and food trucks that clog the main beach at Grand Baie lies a secret shore, a smaller inlet where the water is just as blue, the sand just as white.

But the people are mainly families who bring their children to swim in the placid waters off Pereybere. That doesn’t mean it’s a kid’s beach.

Rather it’s a happy in-between place, close to the restaurants and nightlife in Grand Baie, but quiet enough to feel away from it all.

Here the waters spill out toward a protected marine sanctuary, where the island’s ever-growing hotel developments cannot reach. Smaller islands a short boat ride away are uninhabited except for a little Coast Guard post.

This is where some of the best diving and snorkeling in Mauritius is located.

In places, even snorkeling is too much. Wading in the water is enough to see everything hiding below the surface. For those feeling less active, there’s a luxury catamaran to deliver guests to a beachside gourmet dinner among the ruins of the old Dutch governor’s mansion.

Photography Museum

Down the only pedestrian street in Port Louis, across from the Municipal Theatre, lies one of the city’s hidden treasures.

The Photography Museum is the culmination of Tristan Bréville’s lifelong passion for cameras, and his personal collection of one million images documenting the history of Mauritius.

Only a relative few are on display. Among the jewels are a collection of daguerreotype images that are the first photos taken anywhere in Africa.

Dhal puri at the Central Market

Stack of snacks: Roti flat breads at Central Market

Stack of snacks: Roti flat breads at Central Market

Griffin Shea/CNN

The Central Market in Port Louis underwent a makeover a few years ago, which cleaned up the building and left intact the colors, smells and flavors that define Mauritian cuisine.

Market stalls overflow with chilies, dragon fruit, rose apples and towers of vegetables.

Toward the center is a food hall where vendors serve up fresh juices and the definitive local street food, dhal puri. It’s yellow split peas wrapped inside a roti flat bread and served up with chili to taste.

To figure out the best, join the longest line.

Central Market, Farquhar Street, Port Louis, Mauritius

Le Pouce

The mountain known as Le Pouce overlooks Port Louis. It’s not the tallest peak in Mauritius, but its location next to the capital makes it the most iconic.

Ascending to the top takes about an hour. On the way down, walking all the way to the city center takes two or three hours.

Near the base, in Moka, is The Creole House in Eureka. The colonial home has undergone a gorgeous restoration, and the restaurant prides itself on serving the best Mauritian food.

Eureka, La Maison Creole, Moka, Mauritius; +230 433 8477

Grand Bassin

Grand Bassin, Mauritius

Sacred lake: Grand Bassin

Jean-Marc Astesana/Flickr

When the volcanoes that created Mauritius died out, one of the craters filled with water and became a lake known as Grand Bassin.

It’s also known as Ganga Talao, a name that links the water symbolically to the Ganges River in India. The waters here have taken on a similarly religious significance, with a shrine to Lord Shiva dominating the lakeside.

“Grand Bassin is a lake which is considered to be one of the most sacred places in Mauritius, especially for the Hindu community,” says Sarvesh Unuth, an English teacher visiting the lake.

He says it can get crowded, visited by more than half the island’s population in a few weeks during the Shivratri festival celebrated annually in honor of Lord Shiva.

On other days, it’s a place of tranquil reflection with a microclimate cooler than the rest of Mauritius.

Blue Penny Museum

A museum dedicated to a single stamp may not seem like the most riveting attraction, but the Blue Penny Museum presents an engaging overview of Mauritian history.

The museum centers on two of the rarest stamps in the world: the red penny and the blue penny. Both were issued in 1847 by the British colonial government.

Only 500 were printed of each, from a single plate. The last one sold at public auction in 2011 fetched more than £1,000,000 in London — the highest price ever paid for a stamp.

The Blue Penny Museum showcases rare examples of the stamps, but only for 10 minutes at a time. The museum also presents artwork, coins and engaging passages from Mauritian history as a hub for seafarers crossing the Indian Ocean.

Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Botanical Gardens

Mauritius SSR Botanical Gardens

SSR Botanical Gardens: Lovely lily pads.

Bamba Sourang/Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority

Famed for its truly gigantic water lilies, the SSR Botanical Gardens are a favorite picnic spot for Mauritians who spread out beneath the tropical canopy.

Not all the plants have been labeled, but anyone wanting to know the stories of the flora can hire a guide at the entrance.

In addition to the towering palms, the gardens include many of the plants that produced the spices that brought Europeans battling into Asia for trade in new flavors.

The 18th-century Church of St Francis of Assisi faces the gardens, built for the wealthy landowners of the day.

Champs de Mars Racecourse

The Champs de Mars in Mauritius seeks to become the “next Dubai” as it builds on its huge popularity.

The racecourse occupies an outsize importance in Mauritius.

Where some countries would use a a stadium or a park for grand national events, Mauritius uses its racecourse. Established in 1812, this is where the country declared independence from Britain in 1968.

But it remains in use for horse races from roughly April through November, when the weather is cooler and crowds pack into the grounds to place bets on the weekend.

In the stands, high society mingles in their finest clothes, but the grounds are generally free and open to everyone.

Labourdonnais Orchards

Labourdonnais, Mauritius

The Domaine de Labourdonnais estate was founded in 1774.

Yannick974/Flickr

This grand plantation home was painstakingly restored in 2006 and transformed into a museum to capture the way of life of the great Mauritian landowners.

The Château de Labourdonnais runs (mandatory) tours of the home, but also offers delicious meals at its restaurant and a shop filled with organic products made from fruits grown in the orchards. The distillery produces rum from sugar cane grown on the property.

La Place d’Armes

The main esplanade through Port Louis commands attention, lined with royal palms and old cannons that run from the revitalized port to the French-colonial Government House, the oldest building in Mauritius.

It often feels hotter here than anywhere else on the island, but in the morning, the boulevard makes a nice stroll and a good central point for exploring the colonial buildings on other streets like Rue St. Georges, where the architecture is glorious — whether faded or restored.

Le Morne

Mauritius Le Morne Brabant

A haven for escaped slaves: Le Morne.

Bamba Sourang/Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority

The mountain at Le Morne only opened to the public last year, allowing visitors to explore the site of one of the world’s most significant communities of escaped slaves.

Le Morne Heritage Trust Fund‘s offices are in the nearby village of Le Morne, where visitors can meet with guides who explain the significance of the mountain.

With cliffs on three sides, the mountaintop provided an easily defensible site for maroons, as the escapees were known, who recreated traditions of mainland Africa and gave birth to a new form of music, sega.

Aapravasi Ghat

Nearly 500,000 indentured workers were brought from India to Mauritius between 1834 and 1920, not only to work on the local plantations, but to be sent throughout the British colonies.

When the buildings at Aapravasi Ghat first began processing new arrivals from India, the system was meant to show the superiority of “free” laborers after the abolition of slavery.

The depot at Port Louis was the first step in what became a global system of migration. The buildings are best experienced with a guide, available for free, who can give a better insight into the experiences of the people whose lives were changed here.

“I thought we took some photos together,” she says, scrolling through her phone, talking to herself. “Didn’t we take one on that trip?”
As her daughter tries to jog her memory, Park finally finds one: of her husband in his work clothes, a white decontamination suit and head covering.
Chae Soo-hong worked at a food supplier specializing in jangjorim, a popular Korean side dish of pork cooked in soy sauce. His primary duty was to make sure production was up to standard and on time.
During the week he would travel to the company’s factories and oversee production. On Saturdays, he went to the main office to do paperwork. Even after coming home from work, his job wasn’t done: though it wasn’t his explicit duty, he’d often spend the evening fielding calls from factory employees, mostly foreign migrant workers who needed help adjusting to life in South Korea.
“When he first entered the company in 2015, it had about 30 employees. By the time he died, the company had grown to 80 employees but his duties kept increasing,” Park told CNN.

Chae Soo-hong and Park Hyun-suk during happier times.

Park initially struggled to find photos of her husband not working.

As the company took on more work, Chae was expected to take on more and more work himself, to the extent that when he was at home he was so fatigued he spent most of his time sleeping.
Chae died around 7 p.m. on a Saturday in August 2017. In the morning, as he prepared to go in to the office, just like every weekend before, he had complained of feeling tired but Park didn’t think much of it — he was always tired.
“I should have seen the sign that he was feeling ill,” she said. “He didn’t come home that day.”
Chae’s coworkers found him collapsed on the floor of his office. An exact cause of death was never determined.
He was one of hundreds of people who died in 2017 due to overwork, according to government data. Among OECD countries, South Koreans work more hours per week on average than all but one other country, and almost 50% more than famously industrious Germany.
In July, the government legislated to reduce the maximum working hours from a staggering 68 per week to 40, with 12 hours of paid overtime, in what President Moon Jae-in said would be an “important opportunity to move away from a society of overwork and move toward a society of spending time with families.”
“The most important thing is that it will be a fundamental solution to protecting the lives and safety of the people by reducing the number of deaths from overwork, industrial accidents and sleep-deprived driving,” Moon said.
But for those families who have already paid the cost of overwork, the misery continues — as does the battle for compensation.

Fighting for compensation

Since Chae died at the office, Park assumed his death would be classified as work-related and be covered by workers’ compensation.
She soon found out this would be far more complicated than first thought. The Korea Workers’ Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL), a governmental body, required her to prove unequivocally that Chae died on the job.
“It was a challenge. He (usually) left home at 7am and came home at 10pm but there was no work log showing his working hours,” Park said.
The breakthrough came when she discovered that a highway toll booth her husband passed everyday had a surveillance camera with timestamped footage. Even then however, because Chae worked in a different office on Saturdays, she couldn’t find footage for that day.
While South Korean law does not officially recognize death by overwork, COMWEL regards fatal heart attacks or strokes suffered while working more than 60 hours per week for three months as eligible for workplace death compensation — funds from which can be a major help to families suddenly left without a breadwinner.
Even without proof of his Saturday hours, Park was able to show that her husband worked well over 180 hours in the weeks leading up to his death, becoming one of the lucky few able to get COMWEL to approve a gwarosa case.
Pedestrians cross a road in the Gangnam district of Seoul. South Korea has some of the longest working hours in the world.

Pedestrians cross a road in the Gangnam district of Seoul. South Korea has some of the longest working hours in the world.

Deadly obsession

Once a month since Chae’s death, Park and a dozen or so others have gathered in a small classroom a mile south of the Han river near Noryangjin, next to the largest fish market in Seoul. Participants don’t have much in common except that they have lost a family member — typically a father or husband — to overwork.
Kang Min-jung founded the group after her uncle, who had raised her from childhood, died on the job.
“When he died, I asked why. Why he had to work so much. I decided to study deaths by overwork in Japan,” she said.
Japan has been studying the phenomenon since the 1980s, as it tried to get to grips with its own fatal work culture, and today is the only country to mandate by law that the government study and attempt to remedy the problem.
When she returned to Korea, Kang began organizing meetups for those affected by overwork deaths. This hasn’t been easy — only three people came to the first meeting — with many unaware of the issue or that they could be entitled to compensation under the country’s labor law.
This blindness to overwork extends to those most at risk of dying on the job, like Chae.
“He must have thought that working like that was normal. He is part of the baby boomer generation, which emphasizes working hard and doing the duty as the man of the family. He didn’t complain and didn’t take a break,” Chae’s wife said.
“Korea is a society that demands overworking. They demand you to work long hours. They think that working long means working well and being productive.”
Of the 36 members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), South Koreans worked more hours per week on average than any other member state except Mexico and Costa Rica, which is currently applying to join the group.
As well as literally killing workers, there is little sign these long hours are translating into tangible benefits: data shows South Korea is among the bottom third least productive OECD countries.

Gradual progress

Kim Woo-tark, a labor attorney who attends Kang’s meetings and helps families with COMWEL applications, said the overworking culture is a remnant of the Korean War — the still technically ongoing conflict which has shaped many aspects of South Korean society.
“Because (South) Korea had to quickly get back on its feet after the Korean War, a structure was created that forces each workers to do a great amount,” Kim said. “That structure has become a culture, a custom.”
President Moon came to power last year promising to curb working hours and improve conditions. The 52-hour week went into force on July 1 this year, but proper enforcement will not begin until January 2019 and will initially be limited to companies with more than 300 employees.
One of the first corporations to conform with the law is KT, formerly Korea Telecom. Workers can now see clock-off times on their monitors and managers encourage them to go home rather than work overtime.
Kim Jung-jun, who works for the company’s public relations department, said that his supervisor will ring a bell every day and announce loudly “it’s time to go home, so finish up your work.”
In the three months since the law came into force, Kim said he sleeps more and has more time for family and friends.
The law has also brought broader benefits to society: the Ministry of Labor announced in August that some 43,000 jobs had been created by the change, as corporations were forced to hire more workers rather than force existing employees to do extra hours.
Workers for Korea Post sort packages and letters. The company has faced repeated pressure from workers and the government to reduce employee hours on the job.

Workers for Korea Post sort packages and letters. The company has faced repeated pressure from workers and the government to reduce employee hours on the job.

Organizing for action

Not every employer has responded so well to the change.
Jeong Hak-dong is a postal delivery worker in Ilsan, a satellite city northwest of Seoul. He said that since the new work week came into force, not much has changed.
“The management talks about the 52-hour policy and how that means we need to start work at 8 a.m. and finish by 6 p.m.,” he told CNN. “But the reality is that we are still working past 8 p.m.”
On most days, Jeong said he works around 12 hours, “and even then I don’t get to finish the work.” He said he was worried that as drivers rushed to finish their deliveries faster the risk of traffic accidents could rise.
Last year, a postal worker who was injured in a crash was still asked to come into work. He left a note complaining of inhumane treatment and killed himself.
In July, another worker set himself on fire at his office. His death was followed by two suspected cases of fatal overworking in two months by employees of the same branch.
In the wake of the deaths, members of the Postal Workers’ Union called a relay hunger strike in central Seoul’s Gwanghwamun Square, part of a concerted organizing campaign to pressure the government to end the six-day work week and hire additional workers in order to improve working conditions and allow employees to go home on time.
The Blue House brokered a joint commission in August 2017 between Korea Post, the national service, the Postal Workers’ Union and independent experts to look into working conditions within the industry.
According to the commission’s findings, published this month, nearly 2,000 postal workers were each doing more than 3,000 hours of work per year, upwards of 58 hours per week on average, and the level of workplace stress was worse than that reported by nurses, firefighters or fighter pilots.
Following the report, Korea Post agreed to hire an extra thousand workers next year, with another thousand to be hired in 2020. Union members welcomed the result and declared an end to their hunger strike.
Park Hyun-suk still receives her husband’s compensation check every month, a welcome form of support but also a painful reminder of his death. She welcomed the changes underway, but can’t help wonder that if it came earlier things would have been different for her family.
“I’m sure it’s not just me, and that others who had the same experience are equally haunted by the same guilt,” she said.
“If only I recognized the signs. If only I had reacted with more sensitivity, then none of this would have happened. That guilt always hurts. I try to keep living, but that feeling is always at the bottom of my heart.”
Obama cast President Donald Trump’s administration and Republicans who control both the Senate and House of Representatives as corrupt.
“All right, so now they’ve had two years of total control in Washington,” Obama said at a rally in Gary, Indiana, while campaigning for Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly. “What have they done with that power?”
“Nah, nah, nah, it’s not true. They haven’t done nothing. They’ve done something,” Obama said in response to shouted answers from the crowd. “They promised they were going to take on corruption in Washington. Instead, they’ve racked up enough indictments to field a football team.”
“Nobody in my administration got indicted,” Obama said. “Which, by the way, is not that high a bar.”
Obama repeated the same line at a rally in Chicago, Illinois, hours later.
California Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter and New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins were both indicted in August on unrelated charges.
Hunter was indicted on a series of charges including using campaign funds for personal use and counts of wire fraud, falsifying records, campaign finance violations and conspiracy. Hunter has pleaded not guilty.
Collins was charged with 13 counts of securities fraud, wire fraud and making false statements related to an alleged insider trading scheme. Collins has called the charges “meritless” and also pleaded not guilty.
Four people connected to Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign — Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort, Rick Gates, and George Papadopolous — have been charged, pleaded guilty, or have been convicted at trial as part of a special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible collusion between the Russian government and Trump associates, as well as potential obstruction of justice and financial crimes.
Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser, has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is cooperating with the Mueller investigation. Papadopolous, Trump’s former campaign aide, was sentenced to two weeks in prison for lying to investigators about his contact with individuals tied to Russia during the 2016 campaign. Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, was convicted by a Virginia federal jury earlier this year, and conceded to committing several federal crimes, agreeing to cooperate with the Justice Department, including in Mueller’s investigation. Gates, another former Trump campaign official, pleaded guilty to two criminal charges in Mueller’s wide-ranging investigation and agreed to cooperate with the probe.
In addition, Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, also pleaded guilty to eight criminal counts stemming from an investigation by the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, including tax evasion and campaign finance violations.
New Orleans Saints running back Alvin Kamara (41) scores on a touchdown carry ahead of Los Angeles Rams free safety Lamarcus Joyner (20) and inside linebacker Cory Littleton (58) in the first half of an NFL football game in New Orleans, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018. (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Butch Dill/Associated Press

There are no more undefeated teams in the NFL after the New Orleans Saints earned a 45-35 upset win over the Los Angeles Rams on Sunday.

The Saints couldn’t maintain their 35-17 halftime lead, but a 72-yard Michael Thomas touchdown in the fourth quarter helped secure their seventh straight win, which is now the longest active streak in the NFL. Drew Brees threw four touchdown passes to help his team grab the inside track on the No. 1 seed in the NFC after beating the top contenders in the conference.

Jared Goff had three touchdown passes, but it wasn’t enough to prevent the Rams’ first loss of the season, as they fell to 8-1 on the year. 

       

Alvin Kamara Is Biggest Offensive Mismatch in NFL

Anyone who plays fantasy football knows what kind of numbers Alvin Kamara can put up at his best, and the numbers Sunday were as good as ever with 82 rushing yards, 34 receiving yards and three total touchdowns.

He is still almost underrated with his ability to create big plays by himself, however, especially with the way he scored his first two touchdowns:

Although the third score came on an easy one-yard run up the middle, these other two were plays few others could replicate. He shows patience and athleticism as a runner as well as excellent hands and route running as a receiver.

He turned heads throughout the game regardless of where he lined up:

Brees was at his best and Thomas dominated with 12 catches for 211 yards and a score, but the offensive success was largely thanks to Kamara.

He has seen his usage drop a bit over the past three games since Mark Ingram II returned to the lineup, averaging a mediocre 63.3 yards from scrimmage per game.

He got his touches in this one, though, and he showed the type of impact he can make against an elite opponent. The second-year player must continue to see at least 20 looks every week if the Saints are going to live up to expectations.

      

Rams Defensive Struggles Are Major Concern for Super Bowl Contender

It’s a problem any time the defense gives up 45 points, even when facing a red-hot offense at home led by a future Hall of Fame quarterback.

The Saints were able to easily move the ball down the field in the first half and then came through with big plays in the second exactly when they were needed. The secondary struggled mightily, including the highly touted Marcus Peters at cornerback.

While this could be excusable as one disappointing performance, the truth is the Rams have had problems all year long defensively.

Los Angeles has looked better by the numbers this season, ranking sixth in the NFL in points allowed per game entering the day. However, much of this success was against teams that were in the bottom 10 in scoring coming into Week 9.

The unit allowed just 23 combined points in easy wins over the Oakland Raiders, Arizona Cardinals and San Francisco 49ers, but every other team has scored at least 20 points this season, with three now reaching 30.

It’s clear the defense is worse than many believe:

Aaron Donald is obviously a game-changer in the middle of the defensive line, and he still made an impact with four quarterback hits. The problem is the rest of the players failed to step up against a quality opponent, and they gave the offense no chance to win.

A healthy Aqib Talib could help, but it’s still not enough to turn things around after the recent struggles.

Even at 8-1 on the season, the Rams won’t be a real Super Bowl threat until improvements come on the defensive end.

        

Jared Goff Has No More Question Marks After Consecutive Comeback Efforts

Although he was the No. 1 overall pick in 2016, Jared Goff hasn’t been treated as an elite quarterback over the past two seasons. He has put up big numbers, but these were considered the result of a great coaching staff and talent around him.

Head coach Sean McVay certainly helps, as does Todd Gurley in the backfield and a talented receiving corps, but Goff deserves recognition after his performances in the last two games.

The quarterback led the Rams to a win over the Green Bay Packers last week after trailing by double digits, throwing three touchdown passes with no interceptions in the victory.

He was just as good against the Saints, keeping his composure after an 18-point deficit at halftime.

Even as his teammates made strong plays after the catch, Goff still showed his own talent on several impressive passes that few others could replicate:

We already knew the third-year player can succeed when everything is going well, but his inexperience in challenge situations created a major question mark for the Rams going forward. He only had a single fourth-quarter comeback last season during his 11-4 run as a starter and hadn’t done much more this year.

Although he wasn’t able to close things out against the Saints, his effort in coming back in this game and against the Packers showed he will be a major threat for the rest of the season and in the playoffs.

       

What’s Next?

The Rams continue their toughest stretch of the season with a pair of home games against the Seattle Seahawks and Kansas City Chiefs. The Saints will go on the road to face the Cincinnati Bengals, which had a bye in Week 9.

Obama cast President Donald Trump’s administration and Republicans who control both the Senate and House of Representatives as corrupt.
“All right, so now they’ve had two years of total control in Washington,” Obama said at a rally in Gary, Indiana, while campaigning for Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly. “What have they done with that power?”
“Nah, nah, nah, it’s not true. They haven’t done nothing. They’ve done something,” Obama said in response to shouted answers from the crowd. “They promised they were going to take on corruption in Washington. Instead, they’ve racked up enough indictments to field a football team.”
“Nobody in my administration got indicted,” Obama said. “Which, by the way, is not that high a bar.”
Obama repeated the same line at a rally in Chicago, Illinois, hours later.
California Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter and New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins were both indicted in August on unrelated charges.
Hunter was indicted on a series of charges including using campaign funds for personal use and counts of wire fraud, falsifying records, campaign finance violations and conspiracy. Hunter has pleaded not guilty.
Collins was charged with 13 counts of securities fraud, wire fraud and making false statements related to an alleged insider trading scheme. Collins has called the charges “meritless” and also pleaded not guilty.
Four people connected to Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign — Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort, Rick Gates, and George Papadopolous — have been charged, pleaded guilty, or have been convicted at trial as part of a special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible collusion between the Russian government and Trump associates, as well as potential obstruction of justice and financial crimes.
Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser, has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is cooperating with the Mueller investigation. Papadopolous, Trump’s former campaign aide, was sentenced to two weeks in prison for lying to investigators about his contact with individuals tied to Russia during the 2016 campaign. Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, was convicted by a Virginia federal jury earlier this year, and conceded to committing several federal crimes, agreeing to cooperate with the Justice Department, including in Mueller’s investigation. Gates, another former Trump campaign official, pleaded guilty to two criminal charges in Mueller’s wide-ranging investigation and agreed to cooperate with the probe.
In addition, Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, also pleaded guilty to eight criminal counts stemming from an investigation by the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, including tax evasion and campaign finance violations.